1947 first edition cover

Publication date

Publishedin English

The Diary of a Young Girl (also known as The Diary of Anne Frank) is a book of the writings from the Dutch language diary kept by Anne Frank while she was in hiding for two years with her family during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. The family was apprehended in 1944, and Anne Frank died of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The diary was retrieved by Miep Gies, who gave it to Anne’s father, Otto Frank, the family’s only known survivor. The diary has since been published in more than 60 different languages.

First published under the title Het Achterhuis. Dagboekbrieven 14 Juni 1942 1 Augustus 1944 (The Annex: Diary Notes 14 June 1942 1 August 1944) by Contact Publishing in Amsterdam in 1947, the diary received widespread critical and popular attention on the appearance of its English language translation Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl by Doubleday & Company (United States) and Valentine Mitchell (United Kingdom) in 1952. Its popularity inspired the 1955 play The Diary of Anne Frank by the screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, which they adapted for the screen for the 1959 movie version. The book is included in several lists of the top books of the 20th century.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

During the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, Anne Frank received a blank diary as one of her presents on June 12, 1942, her 13th birthday.[7][8] According to The Anne Frank House, the red, checkered autograph book which Anne used as her diary was actually not a surprise, since she had chosen it the day before with her father when perusing a bookstore near her home.[8] She began to write in it on June 14, 1942, two days later.[9][10] On July 5, 1942, Annes older sister Margot received an official summons to report to a Nazi work camp in Germany, and on July 6, Margot and Anne went into hiding with their father Otto and mother Edith. They were joined by Hermann van Pels, Otto’s business partner, including his wife Auguste and their teenage son Peter.[11] Their hiding place was in the sealed-off upper rooms of the annex at the back of Otto’s company building in Amsterdam.[11][12] The rooms were concealed behind a movable bookcase. Mrs. van Pels’ dentist, Fritz Pfeffer, joined them four months later. In the published version, names were changed: the van Pels are known as the Van Daans and Fritz Pfeffer as Mr. Dussel. With the assistance of a group of Otto Frank’s trusted colleagues, they remained hidden for two years and one month.

They were betrayed in August 1944, which resulted in their deportation to Nazi concentration camps. Of the eight people, only Otto Frank survived the war. Anne died when she was 15 years old in Bergen-Belsen, from typhus. The exact date of her death is unknown and has long been believed to be in early March, a few weeks before the prisoners were liberated by British troops in April 1945. However, new research in 2015 indicated that Anne may have died as early as February.[13]

In manuscript, her original diaries are written over three extant volumes. The first volume (the red-and-white checkered autograph book) covers the period between June 14 and December 5, 1942. Since the second surviving volume (a school exercise book) begins on December 22, 1943, and ends on April 17, 1944, it is assumed that the original volume or volumes between December 1942 and December 1943 were lostpresumably after the arrest, when the hiding place was emptied on Nazi instructions. However, this missing period is covered in the version Anne rewrote for preservation. The third existing volume (which was also a school exercise book) contains entries from April 17 to August 1, 1944, when Anne wrote for the last time before her arrest.[14]:2

The manuscript, written on loose sheets of paper, was found strewn on the floor of the hiding place by Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl after the family’s arrest,[15] but before their rooms were ransacked by the Dutch police and the Gestapo. They were kept safe and given after the war to Otto Frank, with the original notes, when Anne’s death was confirmed in the autumn of 1945.[citation needed]

The diary is not written in the classic forms of “Dear Diary” or as letters to oneself; Anne calls her diary “Kitty”, so almost all of the letters are written to Kitty. Anne used the above-mentioned names for her annex-mates in the first volume, from September 25, 1942 until November 13, 1942, when the first notebook ends.[16] It is believed that these names were taken from characters found in a series of popular Dutch books written by Cissy van Marxveldt.[16]

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The Diary of a Young Girl – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Home My Life Book a Speech Links Forum Follow Me on Twitter Archives July 6, 2015, 5:39 PM ‘ADIOS, AMERICA!’ – THE AUDIOBOOK!, HARDCOVER AND KINDLE – TRUMP OPPONENTS TAKE NUANCED VIEW OF CHILD RAPE

July 22, 2015

So it’s worth examining the cultures we’re introducing to America for the purpose of giving the Democrats votes and businesses cheap labor:

— Seventy-seven percent of reported sexual assaults in Lima, Peru, are against child victims, according to the Latin American and Caribbean Youth Network for Sexual and Reproductive Rights (REDLAC).

— A U.N. Special Rapporteur concluded that the only explanation for “the high degree of impunity for violence against women” in Guatemala was that “at least some of the violence was committed by the authorities.”

— CNN reports that 318 10-year-old girls gave birth in Mexico in 2011.

In all of Western Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand combined, there have been eight reported births to girls aged 10 or younger. Seven of the eight involved Third World immigrants.

— The REDLAC report said that girls between the ages of 10 and 15 accounted for more than 15 percent of all births in Argentina and 17 percent of all births in Uruguay.

By contrast, less than 2 percent of births in the U.S. are to girls in that age group — and most of those are Hispanics, who are seven times more likely to give birth between the ages of 10 and 14 than whites, according to a Centers for Disease Control study.

All peasant cultures exhibit extremely non-progressive views on women and children. Mexico just happens to have the peasant culture that lives within walking distance of the United States.

The rest is here:
Ann Coulter – Official Home Page


After the family was arrested, they were all taken to concentration camps. Edith Frank, Annes mother, died of starvation in Auschwitz on January 6, 1945, a day before the camp was liberated. Margot, Annes sister, and Anne herself both died of typhus in Bergen-Belsen, Margot in March, 1945 and Anne in April, 1945, a few weeks before it, too, was liberated. Otto Frank, her father, was the only survivor from the family (Anne Franks Timeline).

When Otto Frank returned and entered the now abandoned home and Annex, he noticed a drawer open in the antique wooden dresser in the corner. In the drawer there was a green folder marked in Miep Gies’ handwriting, “Annes Diary.” As Otto opened it, tears poured down his face. “This is all that is left of my Anne,” he thought to himself. As he sat on the hard, cold, wooden floor, he began to read aloud the first page: “I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support…” (Frank,1995).

Anne was the type of person who always looked on the bright side of things. Even when she was in hiding, she never doubted the fact she would get out of there alive. She said as one of her first impressions of the Annex, “The Annex is an ideal place to hide in. It may be damp and lopsided, but theres probably not a more comfortable hiding place in all of Amsterdam. No, in all of Holland” (Frank,1995). Most people would have been in severe depression if they were forced to leave their home for a place like this. She would also sometimes prefer the Annex to the outside, because it protected her from the dangers of the street. She referred to it once as “a little piece of blue heaven, surrounded by heavy black rain clouds” (Brown,1991). A hero should always be positive, and that is what Anne was. She never gave up hope, not until the moment she died.

Anne and her family lived in the Secret Annex for almost three years without ever once setting foot outdoors. This would require extreme patience just to be able to stay in the house for so long. In addition, the eight members of the house couldnt move from 8:30 AM to 6:30 PM, so no one would hear them below. This called for even more patience, to sit still for ten hours straight. Anne must have been a calm, even-tempered person if she lived with the same eight people 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 3 years. This trait in Anne demonstrates why she was a great hero.

Anne Frank was a very strong and brave person. When she was younger, living in the Netherlands, her teachers described her as someone who always spoke her mind, someone who liked attention, liked to make people laugh, “a little comedian” (Brown,1991). They also said she was very mature for her age, had a good sense of herself, that “she knew who she was” (Brown,1991). She loved performing, especially in school plays. To keep herself strong, she used a diary she received for her 13th birthday as an outlet for her fear. “When I write, I can shake off all my cares” (Anne Frank: Her Life and Times). Her personality was strong, which in turn allowed her to show great bravery in life. She must have had to be extremely brave to sit in bed at night and hear the sirens, taking away friends and family. She also heard the bombs, the explosions as the war raged around her. For her to be able to handle this, and still go on living a semi-normal life, as recorded in her diary, proved that she was very brave.

By writing her famous diary, Anne Frank helped the world understand that the 6 million Jews killed in the Holocaust had faces, lives, and personalities. She has been called the “human face of the Holocaust,” and her personal record of “her struggle to keep hope alive through the darkest days of this century has touched the hearts of millions” (Mller). She helped teach people that the Holocaust did happen, and it was a horrible thing. Without her help, the world would never know the intensity of the pain caused during this time. A boy, who was once so moved after he performed in a play about Anne, wrote to Otto Frank, and said that he realized that “not only does Anne stand for the Jews, but for any human being who suffered because of his beliefs, color, or race” (Brown,1991).

Anne Frank is a hero because she was optimistic, patient, unselfish, and strong. For some, she has been someone to look up to. For others, she has been a victim of wrongdoing that will help to prevent the same tragedy from happening again. She died unjustly. If she had lived, she could have been someone who was famous for her life, not her death.

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The My Hero Project – Anne Frank

Written on July 19th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Anne Frank: The Whole Story Click Here To Watch and Download Full Movie http://movieonline.moviejosss.com/pla…

Release: Genres: Drama, Overview: Anne Frank: The Whole Story is a film based on the life of Anne Frank, a Jewish girl growing up in Nazi occupied Holland. When war breaks out Anne end amp; her family, Otto her father, Edith her mother end amp; Margot her sister move from Germany to Holland where they are sure they will be safe. However when the Nazi’s invade Holland, the family are forced into hiding. Free Download http://movieonline.moviejosss.com/pla…

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Anne Frank: The Whole Story – YouTube

Written on July 13th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , ,

When the diary of Anne Frank was first published in English, as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, a full decade had passed since a young Anne received the fateful journal for her 13th birthday. Five years had passed since the diary had been published in the Netherlandson this day, June 25, in 1947, as Het Achterhuisand more than dozen had passed since its author stopped writing down her days.

And yet, despite the passage of time, her story was something new, a different way of understanding the horrors of the Holocaust. The resulting diary is one of the most moving stories that anyone, anywhere, has managed to tell about World War II, as TIMEs book reviewer put it, describing the diarists experiences:

As the war dragged on and news trickled in of mass deportations of Jews, Anne became desperate. She had terrifying fantasies about the death of Jewish friends. Often she saw rows of good, innocent people accompanied by crying children [walk] on and on . . . bullied and knocked about until they almost drop. With appalling prescience she wrote that there is nothing we can do but wait as calmly as we can till the misery comes to an end. Jews and Christians wait, the whole earth waits; and there are many who wait for death. When her pen fell into the fire, she wrote that it has been cremated.

Though not much interested in politics, Anne tried to understand what was happening to the world. I dont believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone, are guilty of the war, she wrote. Oh no, the little man is just as guilty, otherwise the peoples of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! Theres in people simply an urge to destroy, an urge to kill, to murder and rage, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged

But sometimes she cried out from the heart, as if for all the Jews of Europe: Who has inflicted this upon us? Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up to now? It is God that has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again.

Many more decades have passed by nowthis year marks the 70th anniversary of Anne Franks death at Bergen-Belsenand her fathers decision to execute her wish to have her diary published continues to prove significant. According to the Anne Frank House, it has since been published in 70 languages.

More here:
Diary of Anne Frank: Read TIME’s Original Review of the Book


Anne Frank,in full Annelies Marie Frank (born June 12, 1929,Frankfurt am Main, Germanydied February/March 1945,Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, near Hannover),young Jewish girl whose diary of her familys two years in hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands became a classic of war literature.

Early in the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler, Annes father, Otto Frank (18891980), a German businessman, took his wife and two daughters to live in Amsterdam. In 1941, after German forces occupied the Netherlands, Anne was compelled to transfer from a public to a Jewish school. Faced with deportation (supposedly to a forced-labour camp), the Franks went into hiding on July 9, 1942, with four other Jews in the backroom office and warehouse of Otto Franks food-products business. With the aid of a few non-Jewish friends, among them Miep Gies, who smuggled in food and other supplies, they lived confined to their secret annex until August 4, 1944, when the Gestapo, acting on a tip from Dutch informers, discovered them.

The family was transported to Westerbork, a transit camp in the Netherlands, and from there to Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland on September 3, 1944, on the last transport to leave Westerbork for Auschwitz. Anne and her sister, Margot, were transferred to Bergen-Belsen the following month. Annes mother died in early January, just before the evacuation of Auschwitz on January 18, 1945. It was established by the Dutch government that both Anne and Margot died in a typhus epidemic in March 1945, only weeks before the liberation of Bergen-Belsen. In 2015 scholars revealed new research, including analysis of archival data and first-person accounts, indicating that the sisters might have perished in February 1945. Otto Frank was found hospitalized at Auschwitz when it was liberated by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945.

Friends who had searched the familys hiding place after their capture later gave Otto Frank the papers left behind by the Gestapo. Among them he found Annes diary, which was published as The Diary of a Young Girl (originally in Dutch, 1947). It is precocious in style and insight and traces her emotional growth amid adversity. In it she wrote, In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.

The Diary has been translated into more than 65 languages and is the most widely read diary of the Holocaust, and Anne is probably the best-known of Holocaust victims. The Diary was also made into a play that premiered on Broadway in October 1955, and in 1956 it won both the Tony Award for best play and the Pulitzer Prize for best drama. A film version directed by George Stevens was produced in 1959. The well-received play was controversial and was challenged by screenwriter Meyer Levin, who wrote an early version of the play (later realized as a 35-minute radio play) and accused Otto Frank and his chosen screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett of sanitizing and de-Judaizing the story. The play was often performed in high schools throughout the world and was revived (with additions) on Broadway in 199798. A new English translation of the Diary, published in 1995, contained material that had been edited out of the original version, making the revised translation nearly one-third longer than the first. The Frank familys hiding place on the Prinsengracht, a canal in Amsterdam, has become a museum and is consistently among the most-visited tourist sites in Amsterdam.

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Anne Frank | biography – German diarist | Britannica.com

Written on June 21st, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , ,

I looked forward to Amsterdam; meeting up with my friend Laura, and attending to unfinished business.

We met at Schiphol Airport, or shit pool, as she called it. It was a relief to see Laura. The last five weeks of traveling, had been a challenging, and I longed for familiarity, and people who spoke English.

Before I left for Amsterdam, I got an email from my mother. “Dani, have fun and don’t smoke too much dope.” Where do I begin with that?

I first visited Amsterdam when I spent a semester abroad studying in Paris, when I was in college. School was a breeze, and it didn’t require a great deal of studying, so I was able to travel every weekend. For six months I took full advantage of my time in Europe. One weekend I decided to go to Amsterdam.

I arrived at the architecturally impressive train station in the city of legal drugs, legal prostitution and cheese. I stayed at Bob’s Youth Hostel, which at the time was a popular backpacker hangout. By coincidence, I ran into a couple of girls from my program back in Paris. They invited me to hang out with them, or I invited myself, I can’t remember. They were partiers. I was not. They wanted to lounge in coffee shops, and smoke dope. I did not. I wanted to go to the Van Gogh Museum and to The Anne Frank House–they did not.

Actually, I didn’t either but my father sent me off to Europe with a list of recommended places to see, and I didn’t want to disappoint him, so I made sure that I ticked each and every one the list before I returned home. Taking the list literally dispels any mystery as to why I spent a good part of my entire adult life in therapy.

I went out to dinner with the girls, and ate a space cake. The details are foggy at best, but suffice it to say that the girls continued on to other coffee shops, and I went back to Bob’s to throw up. I hurled all through the night, which must have been a real treat for the forty other fellow travelers sharing the room with me.

I felt better in the morning so I went to the Van Gogh museum. When one acts for the sole purpose of checking off a list, chances are, one is not going to remember much, as it was in my case. I have zero recollection of what was in the museum; I assume some Van Gogh pieces.

I was still feeling okay, so I walked over to the Anne Frank house. I waited in line, bought my ticket and went inside. Just as I was midway up the attic staircase, a sudden wave of nausea washed over me. Please, no. Any place but the attic! I quickly did an about face, and bolted down the one-way staircase the wrong way. It was too late. There wasn’t time to find the actual exit.

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Anne Frank Made Me Throw Up | Dani Alpert

Written on June 16th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

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Anne Frank – Photos – The life and legacy of Anne Frank …

Written on June 13th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

By Carol Roach, 8th Jun 2015 | Follow this author | | Short URL http://nut.bz/3v2rflqj/ Posted in Wikinut>Guides>History

Everywhere you go you hear about crimes against humanity. We will be reviewing the life of Anne Frank, a young girl who died in a Nazi concentration camp. Her story has been read by millions of people around the world.

One of the most important figures of the Nazi era was a young girl by the name of Anne Frank. She was just an ordinary teenager and had hopes and dreams like any other teenager of her day and future generations to come.

The only trouble was that she was Jewish during the Nazi era and that fate meant death for many. Death was inevitable for young innocent girls and boys and Jewish people; six million of them who were herded off to concentrations camps, imprisoned, starved, worked to death, and experimented on in the most vilest of ways. Then burned in the furnaces, and discarded like garbage. Human lives, not worth a thing to their Nazi oppressors.

The Jewish people, a fine spirited people, will not let these atrocities fade from human memory. We must never forget the holocaust, we must preserve the sanctity of human life and the health and welfare of all people’s of the world. Tikkun o’lam just as Jewish people declare, we must repair the world.

In the grand scheme of things human life is held worthless. There is no real regard for health or dignity.

I was a young girl myself when I read the Diary of Anne Frank, oh how I could identify with Anne and even though I was a Christian teenager and Anne was a Jewish one, we were both innocent young girls who had done nothing wrong. We were innocent young girls who had hopes and dreams for the life ahead of us. I examiner had a chance to make my life; Anne Frank was never given that opportunity.

My life was completely changed once I read that book. Incidentally it was required reading for my Montreal high school 9th grade English class and I was so glad that it was.

Before that book I took he peaceful life in Montreal for granted. Afterward I began to see the world outside of my own city and country was not the safe haven I had always thought it was.

The Diary of Anne Frank made me realize that World War II was not about the good guys getting rid of the bad guys as I had previously thought. War was ugly and innocent people got hurt.

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The Diary of Anne Frank

Written on June 9th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , ,

By Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. Adapted by Wendy Kesselman. Directed by Jillian Keiley. Until Oct. 10 at the Avon Theatre. 1-800-567-1600

STRATFORDHow can one of the most powerful stories of our time, acted by a superb cast, wind up as a less than satisfying theatrical experience?

Ask Jillian Keiley, because it was her direction that turned Thursday nights premiere of The Diary of Anne Frank into such a mishmash.

My heart sank as soon as I saw Bretta Gereckes set, a large, looming box made out of wooden slats. It looked nothing like the cramped garret where eight hunted Jews hid out from the marauding Nazis in the Amsterdam of the 1940s.

It didnt take a major act of clairvoyance to see that it would probably be transformed in the plays final minutes into the lethal boxcars that took people to the death camps, but why destroy any sense of realism or mood for the two hours before that?

My heart continued plummeting when the entire cast came out and addressed us all with personal anecdotes that tried to tangentially connect them to the world of the show and then vanished upstage to become part of a wordless a cappella chorus that crooned Jonathan Monros sentimental music for far too much of the show.

If there ever was a story that needed no adornment, no sentiment and no fixing of any kind, its that of Anne Frank, the precocious young woman who kept a diary chronicling the brave struggle of her family and other companions in that attic in solitude for several years.

As originally dramatized by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, then later amplified by Wendy Kesselman, its a work of great power that cant help but wring the heart . . . unless its meddled with.

Even in this production, there were some long, extended scenes, like the touching Chanukah celebration that ends Act I, when the script and the actors were allowed to work their magic.

And what actors! Sara Farb continues her winning streak of Stratford performances with an Anne who is honest and feisty and totally real, someone we love because of her faults, not despite them.

Originally posted here:
The Diary of Anne Frank: review | Toronto Star