Frank, Anne. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1952. (D 810 .J4 F715 1952) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

First edition of the Diary to be published in English. Based on Annes original and self-edited diaries, which were further edited by Otto Frank for publication. Includes an introduction by Eleanor Roosevelt.

Frank, Anne. Anne Franks Tales from the Secret Annex. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1983. (PT 5881.16 .R26 V413 1983) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A collection of Anne Franks lesser-known writings, including short stories, fables, personal reminiscences, and essays.

Frank, Anne. The Diary of Anne Frank: The Revised Critical Edition. New York: Doubleday, 2003. (DS 135 .N5 A53413 2003) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Revised and expanded version of the Critical Edition, originally published in 1989. Collates all of Annes known writings, including different versions of her diary and her short stories. Also includes a summary of the document examination and handwriting identification analysis completed in 1986 by the Netherlands State Forensic Science Laboratory.

Frank, Anne. Diary of a Young Girl. West Hatfield, MA: Pennyroyal Press with Jewish Heritage Publishing, 1985. (Rare DS 135 .N5 F73 1985) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Along with the text of the diary, includes finely etched plates that reflect the events, places, and people living in the Secret Annex.

Frank, Anne. The Diary of a Young Girl: The Definitive Edition. New York: Doubleday, 1995. (DS 135 .N6 F73313 1995) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Based in large part on the edited version of the diary Anne created in 1944 in the hopes that it would be published after the War. Includes thirty percent more material than the shorter version of the diary Annes father originally published.

Frank, Anne. The Works of Anne Frank. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1959. (PT 5834 .F828 A1 1959a) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Includes the text of the diary, as well as Annes personal reminiscences, essays, and stories.

Metselaar, Menno. The Story of Anne Frank. Amsterdam: Anne Frank House, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F3492513 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Presents the diary of Anne Frank with descriptions throughout the text. Includes images of the diary, family photographs, and other illustrations.

Adler, David, and Karen Ritz. Picture Book of Anne Frank. New York: Holiday House, 1994. (DS 135 .N6 F7313 1993) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An illustrated chronicle of the life of Anne Frank, who kept a diary during her familys attempts to hide from the Nazis in the 1940s. Written for children.

Amdur, Richard. Anne Frank. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1993. (DS 135 .N6 F7315 1993) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A biography written for young adults and illustrated with photographs of Anne and her family, their helpers, and scenes from the Holocaust. Includes three appendices, a Further Reading section, a chronology, and an index. Part of the Chelsea House Library of Biography series.

Anne Frank Stichting. Anne Frank: A History for Today. Amsterdam: Anne Frank House, 1995. (DS 135 .N5 A535 1995) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Uses illustrations and text to chronicle Annes story, along with the history of the Holocaust. Interweaves this story with the experiences of Holocaust survivors and Frank family friends. Briefly comments on the state of post-war anti-Semitism and racism worldwide.

Ashby, Ruth. Anne Frank: Young Diarist. New York: Aladdin, 2005. (DS 135 .N6 F73157 2005) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Recounts the life story of Anne Frank. Includes lists of further readings. Part of the Childhood of World Figures series, this book is written for young readers.

Brown, Gene. Anne Frank, Child of the Holocaust. New York: Blackbirch Marketing, 1997. (DS 135 .N6 F732 1991) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A brief biography with illustrations that sets Annes story in the larger context of the Holocaust. Includes a short glossary and bibliography. Written for young adults as part of the Library of Famous Women series.

Brown, Jonatha A. Anne Frank. Milwaukee, WI: World Almanac Library, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F7323 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Tells the story of Anne Frank and the Holocaust through pictures and narrations. Includes statistics, a chronology, a glossary, recommended readings, and an index. Part of the Trailblazers of the Modern World series, this book is written for young readers.

Frank, Otto. Anne Frank and Family: Photographs. Amsterdam: Anne Frank House, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F733433 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Compiles images of the Frank family taken by Otto Frank between 1926 and 1941. Includes captions, an introduction, and a list of family members and their fates.

Gies, Miep. Anne Frank Remembered: The Story of the Woman who Helped to Hide the Frank Family. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1987. (DS 135 .N5 A536 1987) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

One of the people who helped the Frank family while they were in hiding recalls life under Nazi occupation, including the day the Franks were discovered, her attempts to bribe the Gestapo to release the Franks, and the Hunger Winter in Holland. Includes photographs of the Frank family and their helpers.

Gold, Alison Leslie. Memories of Anne Frank: Reflections of a Childhood Friend. New York: Scholastic, 1997. (DS 135 .N6 P493 1997) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An account of Anne Franks life before and after she went into hiding by Hannah Pick-Goslar, a close childhood friend. Includes photographs of Hannah and Anne. Written for young adults.

Hansen, Jennifer, editor. Anne Frank. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2003. (DS 135 .N6 F7316 2003) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Presents various essays which examine aspects of Annes life in hiding, her arrest, the diary, and her legacy. Includes discussion questions, appendices, a chronology, recommended readings, and an index. Part of the People Who Made History series, this book is written for young readers.

Hermann, Spring. Anne Frank: Hope in the Shadows of the Holocaust. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F73344 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Discusses the life of Anne Frank and the events of the Holocaust. Includes illustrations, a detailed chronology, chapter notes, a glossary, and an index. Part of the Holocaust Heroes and Nazi Criminals series, this book is written for young readers.

Hudson-Goff, Elizabeth, and Jonatha A. Brown. Anne Frank. Milwaukee, WI: World Almanac Library, 2006. (DS 135 .N6 F733449 2006) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Graphic novel recounting the life of Anne Frank through illustrations and a chronological story line. Includes a list of suggested readings and Web sites of interest. Part of the World Almanac Library series, this book is written for young readers.

Hurwitz, Johanna. Anne Frank: Life in Hiding. Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society, 1988. (DS 135 .N6 F7335 1988) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A short biography of Anne written for young adults. Includes black-and-white drawings and a chronology of important dates.

Johnson, Emma. Anne Frank. Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2002. (DS 135 .N6 F7336 2002) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Details the life of Anne Frank, the history of the Holocaust, and the postwar publication of her diary. Includes illustrations, a glossary, timeline, recommendations for further reading, and an index. Part of the Twentieth-Century History Makers series, this book is written for young readers.

Kniesmeyer, Joke. Frank, Anne. In The Encyclopedia of the Holocaust, edited by Israel Gutman, 519-524. New York: Macmillan, 1990. (Ref D 810 .J4 E6 1990 v.2) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Briefly describes Anne Franks family life, their time in hiding, the diary, and the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam.

Koestler-Grack, Rachel A. The Story of Anne Frank. Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea Clubhouse, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F73375 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Details Annes life and the postwar publication of her diary. Includes illustrations, lists of facts and important dates, biographies of other important women of Anne Franks time, a glossary, suggested readings, and an index. Part of the Breakthrough Biographies series, this book is written for young readers.

Kramer, Ann. Anne Frank: The Young Writer who Told the World Her Story. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2007. (DS 135 .N6 F73385 2007) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Illustrated introduction to the life and writings of Anne Frank. Written for young readers, ages 9-12.

Lee, Carol Ann. Roses from the Earth: The Biography of Anne Frank. London: Viking, 1999. (DS 135 .N6 F7334 1999) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An authoritative, detailed biography depicting Annes life and death, as well as that of the other occupants of the Secret Annex. Foreword written by Buddy Elias, last living direct relative of Anne Frank and president of the Anne Frank-Fonds. Includes notes, a selected bibliography, and an index.

Lee, Carol Ann. A Friend Called Anne: One Girls Story of War, Peace, and a Unique Friendship with Anne Frank. New York: Viking, 2005. (DS 135 .N6 F73392 2005) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Retells the story of Jacqueline van Maarsen, Annes best friend before she went into hiding. Discusses the friendship, van Maarsens wartime experiences, and the fame of Annes diary. Includes several letters from Anne to Jackie. Written for young readers.

Lindwer, Willy. The Last Seven Months of Anne Frank. New York: Pantheon Books, 1991. (DS 135 .N6 F734413 1991) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An account of what happened to Anne between her arrest in August 1944 until her death seven months later. Provides the eyewitness testimony of six Jewish female survivors who describe Annes ordeals as she was transported to Westerbork, Auschwitz, and finally, Bergen-Belsen. Based on the film of the same name.

Mller, Melissa. Anne Frank: The Biography. New York: Metropolitan Books, 1998. (DS 135 .N6 F7349713 1998) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A detailed biography of Anne Frank that portrays both her life in hiding and her death. Draws upon exclusive interviews with family and friends, previously unavailable correspondence, and five additional, unpublished pages of the diary. Includes a diagram of Annes family tree. The Library also has an edition in German under the title, Das Mdchen Anne Frank: Die Biographie, and the story of Mllers research in the video, Anne Frank: The Missing Chapter.

Pressler, Mirjam. Anne Frank: A Hidden Life. New York: Dutton Childrens Books, 2000. (DS 135 .N6 F73513 2000) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Explores the background in which Anne Franks life and diary were set, and presents detailed descriptions of the other occupants of the Secret Annex. Written for young adults by the editor of the definitive edition of the diary.

Rol, Ruud van der. Anne Frank, Beyond the Diary: A Photographic Remembrance. New York: Viking, 1993. (DS 135 .N6 F7385 1993) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Uses extensive photographs and full-color illustrations to chronicle the life of the Frank family both before and during their time in hiding, and places their story in the context of the Holocaust. Includes a glossary, a chronology, and a bibliography, along with a brief essay regarding the different versions of the diary. Written for young adults. The Library also has an edition in French under the title, Anne Frank: Une Vie.

Saunders, Nicholas J. The Life of Anne Frank. Columbus, OH: School Specialty, 2006. (DS 135 .N6 F73558 2006) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Graphic novel recounting the life of Anne Frank through illustrations and a chronological story line. Includes a timeline, list of facts, a glossary, and an index. Part of the Stories from History series, this book is written for young readers.

Sawyer, Kem Knapp. Anne Frank. New York: DK Publishing Company, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F73395 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Intersperses the story of Anne Frank with photographs and illustrations to portray the history of the Holocaust. Includes a timeline of Annes life, source notes, and an index.

Schnabel, Ernst. Anne Frank: A Portrait in Courage. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1958. (D 810 .J4 S32 1958) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A biography of Anne Franks life before she went into hiding, based on interviews with her schoolmates, friends, and acquaintances who survived the war. Interweaves excerpts from Annes diary with a narrative that presents a well-rounded picture of her life before the war. The Library also has an edition in German under the title, Anne Frank: Spur eines Kindes: Ein Bericht.

Shapiro, Edna, editor. The Reminiscences of Victor Kugler, the Mr. Kraler of Anne Franks Diary. Yad Vashem Studies 13 (1979): 353-385. (DS 135.E83 Y3 v. 13) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Presents the first-person account of Victor Kugler, a colleague of Otto Frank, who assisted the Frank family during their time in hiding. Includes a description of Mr. Kuglers attempts to help the Frank family as well as a detailed account of his arrest and imprisonment for helping Jews.

Van Maarsen, Jacqueline. My Friend Anne Frank. New York: Vantage Press, 1989. (DS 135 .N6 F7335513 1989) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Annes best friend in Amsterdam, known to Anne as Jopie, interweaves her own remembrances of Anne with selections from the diary.

Wiesenthal, Simon. Epilogue to Anne Franks Diary. In The Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Memoirs, 171-183. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967. (D 804 .G4 W47 1967) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Recounts the authors difficult attempt to locate Anne Franks arrestor, Karl Silberbauer, and describes what became of Silberbauer after his involvement in the Frank familys arrest became known.

Williams, Brian. The Life and World of Anne Frank. Oxford: Heinemann Library, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F73873 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Account of Anne Franks life and diary in relation to the history of World War II. Includes a glossary, index, and many photographs and illustrations.

Wilson, Cara. Dear Cara: Letters from Otto Frank. Sandwich, MA: North Star Publications, 2001. (DS 135 .S93 F738 2000) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Recounts Wilsons correspondence with Otto Frank during the 1960s and 1970s, and explains the relationship that formed between the two during this turbulent part of the authors life. Portions of this work were previously published in Wilsons earlier book Love, Otto.

Wilson, Cara. Love, Otto: The Legacy of Anne Frank. Kansas City, MO: Andrews and McMeel, 1995. (DS 135 .S93 F738 1995) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Reproductions of the twenty-two years of correspondence between Otto Frank and Cara Weiss (now Wilson), a devotee of Anne Frank since reading her diary at the age of twelve.

Woog, Adam. Anne Frank. San Diego: Lucent Books, 2004. (DS 135 .N6 F73875 2004) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Discusses Annes life before hiding, her period in the attic, her arrest and death, and the postwar efforts to publish her diary. Contains illustrations, endnotes, references, recommendations for further reading, and an index. Part of the Heroes and Villains series, this book is written for young readers.

Woronoff, Kristen. Anne Frank: Voice of Hope. Detroit, MI: Blackbirch Press, 2002. (DS 135 .N6 F7388 2002) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Briefly discusses Annes life and the publication of her diary. Includes illustrations, a glossary, references, and an index. Part of the Famous Women series, this book is written for young readers.

Zee, Nanda van der, and Fritz Pfeffer. De Kamergenoot van Anne Frank. Amsterdam: Lakeman Publishers, 1990. (DS 135 .N6 P4858 1990) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A biography of Fritz Pfeffer, one of the occupants of the Secret Annex.

Rol, Ruud van der. Anne Frank: Une Vie. Amsterdam: Fondation Anne Frank, 1992. (Oversize DS 135 .N6 F738514 1992) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Uses extensive photographs and full-color illustrations to chronicle the life of the Frank family both before and during their time in hiding, and places their story in the context of the Holocaust. Includes a glossary, a chronology, and a bibliography, along with a brief essay regarding the different versions of the diary. Written for young adults. The Library also has an edition in English under the title, Anne Frank, Beyond the Diary: A Photographic Remembrance.

Alexander-Ihme, Esther, et al. Frher wohnten wir in Frankfurt–: Frankfurt am Main und Anne Frank. Frankfurt am Main: Amt fr Wissenschaft und Kunst der Stadt Frankfurt am Main, 1985. (D 810 .J4 F78 1985) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Describes Annes early years in Frankfurt before moving to Amsterdam. Focuses primarily on the lives of Otto and Edith Frank.

Hellwig, Joachim, and Gnther Deicke. Ein Tagebuch fr Anne Frank. Berlin: Verlag der Nation, [1959]. (D 810 .J4 H35 1959) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A photographic essay that places the life of Anne Frank within the context of the events of the Holocaust and the Second World War.

Mller, Melissa. Das Mdchen Anne Frank: Die Biographie. Mnchen: Claasen, 1998. (DS 135 .N6 F73497 1998) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A detailed biography of Anne Frank that portrays both her life in hiding and her death. Draws upon exclusive interviews with family and friends, previously unavailable correspondence, and five additional, unpublished pages of the diary. Includes a diagram of Annes family tree. The Library also has an edition in English under the title, Anne Frank: The Biography.

Schnabel, Ernst. Anne Frank: Spur eines Kindes: Ein Bericht. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1958. (D 810 .J4 S32 1958) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

A biography of Anne Franks life before she went into hiding, based on interviews with her schoolmates, friends, and acquaintances who survived the war. Interweaves excerpts from Annes diary with a narrative that presents a well-rounded picture of her life before the war. The Library also has an edition in English under the title, Anne Frank: A Portrait in Courage.

Steen, Jrgen, et al. Anne aus Frankfurt: Leben und Lebenswelt Anne Franks. Frankfurt am Main: Historisches Museum Frankfurt am Main, 1990. (DS 135 .G42 H52 FRA A56 1990) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

Describes life for the Franks in Frankfurt and Amsterdam, as well as conditions in both cities while the Franks were living there.

Anne Frank House: A Museum with a Story. s-Gravenhage: Sdu Uitgeverij Koninginnegracht, 1992. (D 804.175 .A47 A55213 1992) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An historical look at the actual canal-side house where Anne Frank wrote her diary. Reviews the story of the Frank family and their time in hiding. Contains illustrations of the house and the surrounding area.

Anne Frank House: A Museum with a Story. Amsterdam: Anne Frank House, 1999. (Oversize DS 135 .N6 F7384 1999) [Find in a library near you (external link)]

An extensively illustrated work with images from the collection and exhibition of the Anne Frank House, quotations from the diary, and other photographs from the Holocaust period.

Read more:
Anne Frank United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Written on August 15th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The story of the young diarist. By Lawrence Graver

Reprinted with permission from The Yale Holocaust Encyclopedia (Yale University Press).

Anne Frank (1929-1945) was a German-Dutch Jewish girl whose diary of life in hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam is the best-known personal document associated with the Holocaust and one of the most widely read books of modern times.

Born Anneliesse Marie in Frankfurt am Main on 12 June 1929, she was the second daughter of Otto Heinrich (1889-1980), a member of an assimilated, successful Frankfurt banking family that had suffered financial setbacks during the economic crises of the 1920s, and Edith Frank-Hollander (1890-1944), the daughter of a well-to-do manufacturer in Aachen.

After the Nazis came to power in March 1933 and began to persecute the Jews, Otto Frank tried to protect his family and livelihood by moving to Amsterdam (a city he knew well), where he established an independent branch of Opekta Work, a firm that made pectin, a powdered fruit extract in jams and jellies. His wife and children joined him in the winter of 1933-34 and the Franks moved to an apartment on Merwedeplein, a quiet neighborhood in the south of the city.

In the late 1930s, Anne and her sister Margot lived the conventional lives of upper middle-class Dutch children, attending a local Montessori school and socializing with a wide circle of friends; but after the Germans invaded Holland in May 1940 and began to restrict the economic and social activities of Jews, the girls were compelled to attend a segregated school (the Jewish Lyceum), and their father transferred overt control of Opekta and a subsidiary firm to Gentile co-workers.

He also began to make preparations to go into hiding in a sealed-off set of rooms behind his office and warehouse at 263 Prinsengracht.

In May 1942, Jews in Holland were ordered to wear yellow stars for instant identifications; and on 29 June plans were announced to deport all Jews to labor camps in Germany. On 6 July, the morning after Margot received a call-up notice, the Frank family and three friends (Hermann, Auguste, and Peter van Pels), fearing deportation and worse, moved into what became known as the secret annex, or Het Achterhuis (the house behind). An acquaintance, the dentist Fritz Pfeffer, subsequently joined them there.

Did you like this article? MyJewishLearning is a not-for-profit organization.

Please consider making a donation today.

Lawrence Graver is Professor Emeritus at Williams College, and author of An Obsession with Anne Frank, and other books.

Reprinted with permission from The Yale Holocaust Encyclopedia (Yale University Press).

Anne Frank (1929-1945) was a German-Dutch Jewish girl whose diary of life in hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam is the best-known personal document associated with the Holocaust and one of the most widely read books of modern times.

Born Anneliesse Marie in Frankfurt am Main on 12 June 1929, she was the second daughter of Otto Heinrich (1889-1980), a member of an assimilated, successful Frankfurt banking family that had suffered financial setbacks during the economic crises of the 1920s, and Edith Frank-Hollander (1890-1944), the daughter of a well-to-do manufacturer in Aachen.

After the Nazis came to power in March 1933 and began to persecute the Jews, Otto Frank tried to protect his family and livelihood by moving to Amsterdam (a city he knew well), where he established an independent branch of Opekta Work, a firm that made pectin, a powdered fruit extract in jams and jellies. His wife and children joined him in the winter of 1933-34 and the Franks moved to an apartment on Merwedeplein, a quiet neighborhood in the south of the city.

In the late 1930s, Anne and her sister Margot lived the conventional lives of upper middle-class Dutch children, attending a local Montessori school and socializing with a wide circle of friends; but after the Germans invaded Holland in May 1940 and began to restrict the economic and social activities of Jews, the girls were compelled to attend a segregated school (the Jewish Lyceum), and their father transferred overt control of Opekta and a subsidiary firm to Gentile co-workers.

He also began to make preparations to go into hiding in a sealed-off set of rooms behind his office and warehouse at 263 Prinsengracht.

In May 1942, Jews in Holland were ordered to wear yellow stars for instant identifications; and on 29 June plans were announced to deport all Jews to labor camps in Germany. On 6 July, the morning after Margot received a call-up notice, the Frank family and three friends (Hermann, Auguste, and Peter van Pels), fearing deportation and worse, moved into what became known as the secret annex, or Het Achterhuis (the house behind). An acquaintance, the dentist Fritz Pfeffer, subsequently joined them there.

Earlier, on June 12, Anne started keeping a diary in an album she received as a gift from her parents for her thirteenth birthday, writing on the front page: I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope that you will be a great source of comfort and support. The you was not on the diary itself but an imaginary friend, Kitty, to whom she described the daily lives of the incarcerated Jews and her own reactions to growing up in hiding.

During the early months of confinement, Anne wrote vividly about domestic routines and tensions (notably quarrels with her mother), teenage concerns, fear of discovery, longing for independence and freedom, and the stark accounts that reached her of the Nazi persecution of Jews in Amsterdam and elsewhere. As time passed, however, she also recorded with urgency, humor and beauty an expanding awareness of herself as a sexual, moral, political and philosophical being, and as a writer.

In March 1944, in her twenty-first month in hiding, she heard a broadcast from London in which the education minister of the Dutch government in exile urged his countrymen and women to keep accounts of what they endured under German occupation, and she decided to rewrite and edit her diary for publication after the war.

Recasting earlier passages, fictionalizing the names of the actual inhabitants, and sharpening her style, she produced an unfinished, but unfailingly interesting tale of fugitives in hiding, a bitter-sweet adolescent romance involving Peter, and a stirring psychological drama of a girl becoming a young woman. While sequestered, she also wrote a handful of short stories that were to appear in 1956 as Tales of the Secret Annex.

On 4 August 1944, German and Dutch security police (tipped off by an unidentified informer) raided the secret annex and arrested the eight Jews who had been sheltered there for twenty-five months. Annes original and revised diaries, scattered on the floors, were recovered that afternoon by Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl, two of the Gentiles who had courageously kept the occupants alive (the others were Victor Kugler, Johannes Kleiman and Jan Gies).

The Franks, van Pels and Pfeffer were taken first to a local police station, then to the transit camp at Westerbork and finally in September to the extermination camp at Auschwitz Birkenau. Hermann van Pels and Edith Frank died there; Peter van Pels perished in Mauthausen, Fritz Pfeffer in Neuengamme, and Auguste van Pels most likely in or near Theresienstadt.

Anne and Margot were sent to Bergen-Belsen, where they died of typhus and starvation in March 1945, a few weeks before the liberation of the camps by the British and three months short of Annes sixteenth birthday. Otto Frank, the only one of the group to survive, had been freed when Auschwitz was liberated by the Russian army in late January 1945. (See Willy Lindwer, The Last Seven Months of Anne Frank, 1991.)

After Otto Frank returned to Amsterdam in June 1945 and eventually learned that his daughters were dead, Miep Gies gave him Annes diaries and exercise books. In the weeks that followed, he began copying out sections that might interest relatives and friends. Since parts of the diary existed in several versions, Frank served as editor as well as transcriber.

When others read his selections, they were convinced of the manuscripts unusual value both as a document of the war and an engrossing story of a lively young girls maturation, and they urged Frank to seek a publisher. At first he thought the diary would attract little attention from outside the immediate family, but he was persuaded to allow friends to make inquiries.

In early April 1946 (after several Dutch firms turned it down), the Amsterdam newspaper Het Parool printed on its first page an eloquent article by the historian Jan Romein, praising the diary as a strikingly graphic account of daily life in wartime and a revelation of the real hideousness of Fascism, which had destroyed the life of a talented, endearing young girl. Uitgeverji Contact published Het Achterhuis in an edition of 1,500 in June 1947, and it received uniformly positive reviews.

Publishers in other countries were at first skeptical that there would be a market for what some saw as the mundane jottings of a little Dutch girl and a bleak reminder of the recently ended war, but French and German translations appeared in 1950.

The turning point in the history of the diary was its remarkable reception in the United States in the summer of 1952. Thanks mainly to a brilliant review by the novelist Meyer Levin on the front page of The New York Times Book Review, Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl (after having been rejected a dozen times) was an immediate best-seller, providing an intensely personal experience for tens-of-thousands of readers.

Adapted for the theater by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett in 1955, The Diary of Anne Frank induced tears in large audiences, many of whom felt as if one of the unknown Jewish dead in Europe had risen from a mass grave and taken on a distinctive identity. Honored by the Pulitzer prize and the Tony and Drama Critics awards, the play was soon staged in many other countries.

A film version by George Stevens in 1959 further popularized the heart-rending, yet in these versions, reassuring story of the child, her fate, and her book. In America a broad public found it easier to relate to a romantic rendering of the victimization of a real/fictional child than to the almost unimaginable number six million. Dozens of translations followed and sales reached into the many millions.

See the original post here:
Anne Frank – My Jewish Learning

Written on August 15th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

This article is about the mother of Barack Obama. For the British equestrian, see Anne Dunham. Ann Dunham

Ann Dunham in 1960

Stanley Ann Dunham (November 29, 1942 November 7, 1995) was the mother of Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States, and an American anthropologist who specialized in economic anthropology and rural development.[1] Dunham was known as Stanley Dunham through high school, then as Ann Dunham, Ann Obama, Ann Soetoro, Ann Sutoro (after her second divorce), and finally as Ann Dunham.[2] Born in Wichita, Kansas, Dunham spent her childhood in California, Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas, her teenage years in Mercer Island, Washington, and most of her adult life in Hawaii and Indonesia.[3]

Dunham studied at the EastWest Center and at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, where she attained a bachelor’s in anthropology[4] and master’s and Ph.D. in anthropology.[5] She also attended University of Washington at Seattle in 1961-1962. Interested in craftsmanship, weaving and the role of women in cottage industries, Dunham’s research focused on women’s work on the island of Java and blacksmithing in Indonesia. To address the problem of poverty in rural villages, she created microcredit programs while working as a consultant for the United States Agency for International Development. Dunham was also employed by the Ford Foundation in Jakarta and she consulted with the Asian Development Bank in Gujranwala, Pakistan. Towards the latter part of her life, she worked with Bank Rakyat Indonesia, where she helped apply her research to the largest microfinance program in the world.[5]

After her son was elected President, interest renewed in Dunham’s work: The University of Hawaii held a symposium about her research; an exhibition of Dunham’s Indonesian batik textile collection toured the United States; and in December 2009, Duke University Press published Surviving against the Odds: Village Industry in Indonesia, a book based on Dunham’s original 1992 dissertation. Janny Scott, an author and former New York Times reporter, published a biography about Ann Dunham’s life titled A Singular Woman in 2011. Posthumous interest has also led to the creation of The Ann Dunham Soetoro Endowment in the Anthropology Department at the University of Hawaii at Mnoa, as well as the Ann Dunham Soetoro Graduate Fellowships, intended to fund students associated with the EastWest Center (EWC) in Honolulu, Hawaii.[6]

In an interview, Barack Obama referred to his mother as “the dominant figure in my formative years… The values she taught me continue to be my touchstone when it comes to how I go about the world of politics.”[7]

Dunham was born on November 29, 1942 at Saint Francis Hospital in Wichita, Kansas,[8] the only child of Madelyn Lee Payne and Stanley Armour Dunham.[9] She was of predominantly English ancestry, with some German, Swiss, Scottish, Irish, and Welsh ancestry.[10]Wild Bill Hickok is her sixth cousin, five times removed.[11]

Ancestry.com announced on July 30, 2012, after using a combination of old documents and yDNA analysis, that Dunham’s mother may have been descended from African John Punch, who was an indentured servant/slave in seventeenth-century colonial Virginia.[12][13]

Her parents were born in Kansas and met in Wichita, where they married on May 5, 1940.[14] After the attack on Pearl Harbor, her father joined the United States Army and her mother worked at a Boeing plant in Wichita.[15] According to Dunham, she was named after her father because he wanted a son, though her relatives doubt this story and her maternal uncle recalled that her mother named Dunham after her favorite actress Bette Davis’ character in the film In This Our Life because she thought it sounded sophisticated.[16] As a child and teenager she was known as Stanley.[2] Other children teased her about her name but she used it through high school, “apologizing for it each time she introduced herself in a new town”.[17] By the time Dunham began attending college, she was known by her middle name, Ann, instead.[2] After World War II, Dunham’s family moved from Wichita to California while her father attended the University of California, Berkeley. In 1948, they moved to Ponca City, Oklahoma, and from there to Vernon, Texas, and then to El Dorado, Kansas.[18] In 1955, the family moved to Seattle, Washington, where her father was employed as a furniture salesman and her mother worked as vice president of a bank. They lived in an apartment complex in the Wedgwood neighborhood where she attended Nathan Eckstein Junior High School.[19]

In 1956, Dunham’s family moved to Mercer Island, an Eastside suburb of Seattle. Dunham’s parents wanted their 13-year-old daughter to attend the newly opened Mercer Island High School.[7] At the school, teachers Val Foubert and Jim Wichterman taught the importance of challenging social norms and questioning authority to the young Dunham, and she took the lessons to heart: “She felt she didn’t need to date or marry or have children.” One classmate remembered her as “intellectually way more mature than we were and a little bit ahead of her time, in an off-center way”,[7] and a high school friend described her as knowledgeable and progressive: “If you were concerned about something going wrong in the world, Stanley would know about it first. We were liberals before we knew what liberals were.” Another called her “the original feminist”.[7]

Read more from the original source:
Ann Dunham – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Written on August 11th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Un article de Wikipdia, l’encyclopdie libre.

Le livre original avec la photo d’Anne Franck.

uvres principales

modifier

Annelies Marie Frank, plus connue sous le nom dAnne Frank, ne le 12 juin 1929 Francfort-sur-le-Main, en Allemagne, sous la Rpublique de Weimar, ayant vcu la majeure partie de sa vie aux Pays-Bas et morte en fvrier ou mars 1945 (environ deux mois avant la capitulation allemande) Bergen-Belsen en Allemagne nazie, fut une adolescente allemande juive ayant crit un journal intime, rapport dans le livre Le Journal d’Anne Frank, alors qu’elle se cachait avec sa famille et quatre amis Amsterdam pendant l’occupation allemande durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale dans le but d’viter la Shoah.

La famille quitte Francfort pour Amsterdam la fin de lanne 1933 afin d’chapper aux perscutions nazies l’encontre des Juifs qui se multiplient depuis larrive au pouvoir d’Adolf Hitler en janvier. Alors que les dangers s’intensifient Amsterdam occup par les Allemands depuis mai 1940, les Frank se cachent en juillet 1942 dans un appartement secret amnag dans l’Annexe de l’entreprise Opekta d’Otto Frank, le pre. Anne a alors treize ans environ. Aprs deux ans passs dans ce refuge, le groupe est trahi et dport vers les camps d’extermination nazis. Sept mois aprs son arrestation, Anne meurt du typhus dans le camp de Bergen-Belsen quelques jours aprs le dcs de sa sur Margot, et quelques semaines avant la libration du camp .

Son pre Otto, l’unique survivant du groupe, revient Amsterdam la fin de la guerre et apprend que le journal d’Anne dans lequel elle relate sa vision des vnements depuis le 12 juin 1942 jusqu’au 1er aot 1944 a t prserv. Convaincu du caractre unique de l’uvre de sa fille, Otto dcide de la faire diter et le texte original en nerlandais est publi en 1947 sous le titre Het Achterhuis: Dagboekbrieven van 12 Juni 1942 1 Augustus 1944 (L’arrire-cour: notes du journal du 12 juin 1942 au 1eraot 1944). Dcrit comme le travail d’un esprit mr et perspicace, l’uvre donne un point de vue intime et particulier sur la vie quotidienne pendant l’occupation par les nazis et ce journal d’une adolescente au destin tragique a fait d’Anne Frank l’une des victimes emblmatiques de la Shoah. En effet ce Journal a t traduit du nerlandais en de nombreuses langues et est devenu l’un des livres les plus lus dans le monde et plusieurs films, tlfilms, pices de thtre et opras en ont t tirs.

Anne Frank, seconde fille d’Otto Heinrich Frank (12 mai 188919 aot 1980) et d’Edith Frank-Hollnder (16 janvier 19006 janvier 1945), naquit le 12 juin 1929 Francfort-sur-le-Main en Allemagne. Elle avait une sur prnomme Margot (16 fvrier 1926 mars 1945). Son nom de naissance tait Annelies Marie, mais pour sa famille et ses amis, elle tait simplement Anne. Son pre l’appelait parfois Annelein (petite Anne). La famille vcut dans une communaut mixte de citoyens juifs et non-juifs, et les enfants grandirent en ctoyant des amis de confession catholique, protestante et juive. Les Frank taient juifs rformistes, pratiquant beaucoup des traditions de la foi juive, sans observer l’ensemble des coutumes. Dans la famille, Edith tait la plus dvoue sa foi. Otto Frank, ancien officier allemand dcor pendant la Premire Guerre mondiale, voulait poursuivre ses tudes et possdait une importante bibliothque; les deux parents encourageaient leurs filles lire. En mars 1933, les lections pour renouveler le conseil municipal de Francfort virent le parti nazi d’Adolf Hitler l’emporter. Des manifestations antismites eurent immdiatement lieu, et les Frank commencrent craindre pour leur scurit s’ils restaient en Allemagne. Plus tard la mme anne, Edith et les enfants se rendirent Aix-la-Chapelle (Allemagne) pour habiter avec Rosa Hollnder, la mre d’Edith. Otto Frank resta Francfort, mais aprs avoir reu une offre pour dmarrer une affaire Amsterdam, il s’y rendit pour organiser la socit et prparer la venue de sa famille.

Otto commena travailler chez Opekta Works, une socit qui vendait la pectine extraite des fruits, et trouva un appartement Merwedeplein dans la banlieue d’Amsterdam. En fvrier 1934, Edith et les enfants arrivrent Amsterdam et les deux filles furent inscrites l’cole; Margot dans une cole publique et Anne dans une cole montessorienne. Margot montra ses facults en arithmtique et Anne dcouvrit ses aptitudes la lecture et l’criture. Son amie Hannah Goslar se rappela plus tard que pendant sa tendre enfance, Anne Frank crivait rgulirement, cachant ses crits avec sa main et refusant de discuter du contenu de ceux-ci. Ces crits prcoces n’ont pas travers l’histoire jusqu’ nous et ont t gars. Anne et Margot avaient deux personnalits bien distinctes; Margot tait manire, rserve et studieuse tandis qu’Anne tait expressive, nergique et extravertie. En 1938, Otto Frank dmarra une seconde affaire en partenariat avec Hermann van Pels, un boucher qui avait fui Osnabrck en Allemagne avec sa famille. En 1939, la mre d’Edith vint vivre avec les Frank et resta avec eux jusqu’ sa mort en janvier 1942. En mai 1940, l’Allemagne envahit les Pays-Bas. Le gouvernement d’occupation commena perscuter les Juifs en instaurant des lois rpressives et discriminatoires, et l’inscription obligatoire et la sgrgation des Juifs s’ensuivirent rapidement. Margot et Anne excellaient alors dans leurs tudes et avaient de nombreux amis, mais l’application d’un dcret statuant que les enfants juifs ne pouvaient suivre des cours que dans des coles juives, elles furent inscrites au Lyce juif.

Pour son treizime anniversaire le 12 juin 1942, Anne reut un carnet qu’elle avait montr son pre dans un magasin quelques jours plus tt. Lorsqu’elle crit, elle s’adresse Kitty, une amie imaginaire. Bien que ce ft un livre d’autographes, reli avec un morceau de tissu rouge et blanc et muni d’une petite fermeture l’avant, Anne avait dj dcid de l’utiliser comme journal. Elle commena y crire presque immdiatement, se dcrivant personnellement, dcrivant sa famille et ses amis, sa vie l’cole, ses admirateurs et les endroits du voisinage qu’elle aimait visiter. Si ces premiers crits montrent que sa vie tait celle d’une colire typique, ils abordent galement les changements dont Anne a t tmoin depuis le dbut de l’occupation allemande. Quelques rfrences sont apparemment occasionnelles et non soulignes. Nanmoins en quelques passages, Anne fournit plus de dtails sur l’oppression grandissante. Par exemple, elle crit propos de l’toile jaune que les Juifs taient obligs de porter en public, et elle lista quelques restrictions et perscutions qui bouleversrent la vie de la population juive d’Amsterdam.

Go here to see the original:
Anne Frank Wikipdia


Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.

Annelies Marie “Anne” Frank, (pronuncia olandese: [nlis mari n frk], tedesca: [anlis mai an fak]; ascolta[?info]), nome italianizzato in Anna Frank, (Francoforte sul Meno, 12 giugno 1929 Bergen-Belsen, febbraio 1945[1][2][3]), stata una ragazza e scrittrice ebrea tedesca, divenuta un simbolo della Shoah per il suo diario scritto nel periodo in cui lei e la sua famiglia si nascondevano dai nazisti e per la sua tragica morte nel campo di concentramento di Bergen-Belsen.

Visse parte della sua vita ad Amsterdam nei Paesi Bassi, dove la famiglia si era rifugiata dopo l’ascesa al potere dei nazisti in Germania. Fu privata della cittadinanza tedesca nel 1935, divenendo cos apolide e nel proprio diario scrisse che ormai si sentiva olandese e che dopo la guerra avrebbe voluto ottenere la cittadinanza dei Paesi Bassi, Paese nel quale era cresciuta.

Seconda figlia di Otto Heinrich Frank (12 maggio 1889 – 19 agosto 1980) e di sua moglie Edith Frank (16 gennaio 1900 – 6 gennaio 1945) nata Hollnder, apparteneva ad una famiglia di patrioti tedeschi che prestarono servizio durante la Prima guerra mondiale. Aveva una sorella maggiore, Margot Elisabeth Frank (16 febbraio 1926 – febbraio 1945). Nel 1933, Adolf Hitler vinse le elezioni in Germania.

Il crescente numero di manifestazioni antisemite al seguito della vittoria di Hitler indussero Otto Frank a cogliere al volo l’occasione di trasferirsi ad Amsterdam, nei Paesi Bassi. L avvi una ditta producente pectina per la realizzazione di marmellate, la Opekta Works. Nel 1938 Otto avvi una seconda ditta, per la distribuzione di sale da conservazione, erbe e spezie, la Pectacon.

Il 10 maggio 1940, l’esercito tedesco invase l’Olanda. I Frank furono costretti a sottostare alle leggi razziali. Il 12 giugno 1942, Anne ricevette per il suo tredicesimo compleanno un quadernino a quadretti bianco e rosso[4], sul quale inizier a scrivere il Diario, inizialmente sotto forma di annotazioni a proposito della scuola e degli amici, quindi come immaginaria corrispondenza con le protagoniste di una popolare serie di romanzi per ragazze “Joop ter Heul” della scrittrice olandese Cissy van Marxveldt, di cui lei e le amiche erano accanite lettrici.

Meno di un mese dopo, il 6 luglio 1942, la famiglia Frank dovette nascondersi con la famiglia nell’Achterhuis (alloggio segreto, letteralmente “retrocasa” dall’olandese), un piccolo spazio a due piani posto sopra i locali della Opekta di Otto, in seguito ad un invito a comparire inviato alla sorella di Anne, Margot, da parte della polizia tedesca. L’alloggio segreto era situato in un vecchio – ed abbastanza tipico – edificio sul Canale Prinsengracht, nella parte ovest di Amsterdam, a circa un isolato dalla Westerkerk.[5] La porta d’ingresso dell’Achterhuis venne in seguito nascosta dietro una libreria girevole.

Nel nascondiglio trovarono rifugio otto persone:

La famiglia Van Pels raggiunse i Frank il 13 luglio 1942; il dentista Pfeffer arriv il 16 novembre 1942. I clandestini erano aiutati da persone esterne: Miep Gies, Jan Gies, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler, Bep Voskuilj, il signor Voskuilj (padre di Bep) e la moglie di Kleiman, quasi tutti collaboratori nelle ditte del padre di Anne. Portavano ai clandestini cibo, notizie e ogni cosa di cui avessero bisogno, rischiando la vita. Tali persone erano anche le uniche ad essere al corrente del nascondiglio dei clandestini.

Durante il periodo di clandestinit, Anne scrive il celeberrimo Diario, descrivendo con considerevole talento le paure causate dal vivere in clandestinit, i sentimenti per Peter, i conflitti con i genitori e gli altri compagni di sventura e le sue aspirazioni di diventare scrittrice ed ottenere la cittadinanza olandese. Alcuni brani del diario in cui la ragazza, ormai alle soglie della pubert, annota i propri dubbi e curiosit riguardo al sesso, vennero in seguito espunte dalle prime versioni date alle stampe, cos come una serie di annotazioni della giovane in merito ai suoi dubbi circa l’affiatamento dei propri genitori.

Read more:
Anna Frank – Wikipedia


Anne Hathaway

Hathaway in 2014

Anne Jacqueline Hathaway (born November 12, 1982) is an American actress, singer, and producer.

After several stage roles, Hathaway appeared in the 1999 television series Get Real. She came to prominence after playing Mia Thermopolis in the Disney film The Princess Diaries (2001) and in its 2004 sequel. Since then, Hathaway has starred in dramatic films such as the 2005 films Havoc and Brokeback Mountain. She has also starred in The Devil Wears Prada in 2006 and in Becoming Jane (2007) as Jane Austen and also in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar (2014) as Dr. Brand.

In 2008, she won several awards for her performance in Rachel Getting Married, also earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. In 2010, she starred in the box office hits Valentine’s Day, Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland, and Love and Other Drugs and won an Emmy Award for her voice-over performance on The Simpsons. In 2011, she had a voice role in the animated film Rio. In 2012, she portrayed Selina Kyle/Catwoman in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises and Fantine in Tom Hooper’s Les Misrables. Her performance in the latter earned her rave reviews and several accolades, including the Golden Globe Award, the Screen Actors Guild Award, the BAFTA Award and the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

People magazine named her one of its breakthrough stars of 2001,[1] and she appeared on its list of the world’s 50 Most Beautiful People in 2006.[2]

Hathaway was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Kathleen Ann “Kate” (ne McCauley) and Gerald Thomas Hathaway.[3] Her father is a lawyer, and her mother is a former actress who inspired Hathaway to follow in her footsteps.[4] Hathaway’s mother played Fantine in the first U.S. tour of Les Misrables.[5] When Hathaway was six years old, the family moved to Millburn, New Jersey, where she grew up.[6] Hathaway is the middle of three children with an older brother, Michael, and a younger brother, Thomas. She is of mostly French and Irish ancestry, with distant Native American and German roots.[7]

Raised Roman Catholic with what she considers “really strong values”, Hathaway stated that she wished to be a nun during her childhood: “When I was 11, I felt like I got a calling from God to be a nun.”[6][8] At the age of 15, her relationship with the Catholic Church changed after she learned that her brother Michael was gay.[8] She has stated: “I realized my older brother was gay, and I couldn’t support a religion that didn’t support my brother. Now I call myself a non-denominational Christian, because I haven’t found the religion for me.”[9] In 2009, she stated that her religious beliefs are “a work in progress”.[8][10]

Hathaway attended Brooklyn Heights Montessori School and Wyoming Elementary School in Millburn.[11] She graduated from Millburn High School, where she participated in many school plays; her high school performance as Winnifred in Once Upon a Mattress gained her a Paper Mill Playhouse Rising Star Award nomination for Best Performance by a High School Actress. During this time, she was in plays including Jane Eyre and Gigi at New Jersey’s Paper Mill Playhouse.[12] She spent several semesters studying as an English major and Women’s Studies minor at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, before transferring to New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, referring to her college enrollment as one of her best decisions because she enjoyed being with others who were trying to “grow up”.[13]

Hathaway also studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, and was the first teenager admitted into The Barrow Group Theater Company’s acting program.[14] A soprano, she performed in 1998 and 1999 with the All-Eastern U.S. High School Honors Chorus at Carnegie Hall and has performed in plays at Seton Hall Preparatory School in West Orange, New Jersey. She is a trained stage actress and has stated that she prefers performing on stage to film roles.[6] Her acting style has been compared to those of Judy Garland and Audrey Hepburn.[15] She cites Garland as one of her favorite actresses[11] and Meryl Streep as her idol.[16]

Excerpt from:
Anne Hathaway – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Written on August 9th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , ,

71 years ago today, Anne Frank and the 7 other members of the Secret Annex were arrested. Anne and six other people who hid with her perished in the concentration camps. Only her father survived, and he spent the rest of his life educating people on the Holocaust through his daughters diary.

http://www.annefrank.org/en/Anne-Frank/Discovery-and-arrest/

If Anne was alive today, she would be 86 years old. She wrote in her diary that she believed that people really were good, but I wonder if she would feel this way if she had survived the Holocaust. Six million plus people-both Jewish and non-Jewish were killed in Hitlers camps. The vast majority were Jewish people, make the Holocaust one of the most massive genocides in history, but it wasnt the first, nor was it the last

1915-1923:One million Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks are executed, murdered, or die of exposure or disease on orders of the Turkish government.

1933-1945:Holocaust in Europe. Six million Jews, and five million Roma, Slavs, Jehovahs Witnesses, and others are systematically murdered in Nazis concentration camps. Anne Frank among them.

1975-1979:About 2 million Cambodians are killed by the Khmer Rouge. Many of them were educated Cambodians that the Rouge suspected of being political dissidents.

1994:In the space of only 100 days, 800,000 Tutsi, moderate Hutu, and Twa are murdered by machete in Rwanda, by Hutu.

1991-1995:100,000 Bosnians and Croatians in Bosnia were killed by Serbs in the name of ethnic cleansing.

2003-2013:The Government of Sudan carried out genocide in Darfur, killing 300,000. In 2015, the genocide started again.

Hundred of years and still being felt today:The genocide via introduced disease, murder, and the forced seperation of families of the Native peoples of the United States.

See the original post:
Anne Frank | Stacie M Stark


On this day in 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden are found hacked to death in their Fall River, Massachusetts, home. Andrew was discovered in a pool of blood on the living room couch, his face nearly split in two. Abby was upstairs, her head smashed to pieces; it was later determined that she was killed first. Suspicion soon fell on one of the Bordens’ two daughters, Lizzie, age 32 and single, who lived with her wealthy father and stepmother and was the only other person besides their maid, Bridget Sullivan, who was home when the bodies were found. Lizzie Borden was arrested and charged with the double homicide. As a result of the crime’s sensational nature, her trial attracted national attention.

Acting on tip from a Dutch informer, the Nazi Gestapo captures 15-year-old Jewish diarist Anne Frank and her family in a sealed-off area of an Amsterdam warehouse. The Franks had taken shelter there in 1942 out of fear of deportation to a Nazi concentration camp. They occupied the small space with another Jewish family and a single Jewish man, and were aided by Christian friends, who brought them food and supplies. Anne spent much of her time in the secret annex working on her diary. The diary survived the war, overlooked by the Gestapo that discovered the hiding place, but Anne and nearly all of the others perished in the Nazi death camps.

Annelies Marie Frank was born in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, on June 12, 1929. She was the second daughter of Otto Frank and Edith Frank-Hollander, both of Jewish families that had lived in Germany for centuries. With the rise of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler in 1933, Otto moved his family to Amsterdam to escape the escalating Nazi persecution of Jews. In Holland, he ran a successful spice and jam business. Anne attended a Montessori school with other middle-class Dutch children, but with the German invasion of the Netherlands in 1940 she was forced to transfer to a Jewish school. In 1942, Otto began arranging a hiding place in an annex of his warehouse on the Prinsengracht Canal in Amsterdam.

On her 13th birthday in 1942, Anne began a diary relating her everyday experiences, her relationship with her family and friends, and observations about the increasingly dangerous world around her. Less than a month later, Annes older sister, Margot, received a call-up notice to report to a Nazi work camp. Fearing deportation to a Nazi concentration camp, the Frank family took shelter in the secret annex the next day. One week later, they were joined by Otto Franks business partner and his family. In November, a Jewish dentistthe eighth occupant of the hiding placejoined the group.

For two years, Anne kept a diary about her life in hiding that is marked with poignancy, humor, and insight. The entrance to the secret annex was hidden by a hinged bookcase, and former employees of Otto and other Dutch friends delivered them food and supplies procured at high risk. Anne and the others lived in rooms with blacked-out windows, and never flushed the toilet during the day out of fear that their presence would be detected. In June 1944, Annes spirits were raised by the Allied landing at Normandy, and she was hopeful that the long-awaited liberation of Holland would soon begin.

On August 1, 1944, Anne made her last entry in her diary. Three days later, 25 months of seclusion ended with the arrival of the Nazi Gestapo. Anne and the others had been given away by an unknown informer, and they were arrested along with two of the Christians who had helped shelter them. They were sent to a concentration camp in Holland, and in September Anne and most of the others were shipped to the Auschwitz death camp in Poland. In the fall of 1944, with the Soviet liberation of Poland underway, Anne was moved with her sister Margot to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. Suffering under the deplorable conditions of the camp, the two sisters caught typhus and died in early March 1945. The camp was liberated by the British less than two months later.

Otto Frank was the only one of the 10 to survive the Nazi death camps. After the war, he returned to Amsterdam via Russia, and was reunited with Miep Gies, one of his former employees who had helped shelter him. She handed him Annes diary, which she had found undisturbed after the Nazi raid. In 1947, Annes diary was published by Otto in its original Dutch as Diary of a Young Girl. An instant best-seller and eventually translated into more than 50 languages, The Diary of Anne Frank has served as a literary testament to the nearly six million Jews, including Anne herself, who were silenced in the Holocaust.

The Frank familys hideaway at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam opened as a museum in 1960. A new English translation of Annes diary in 1995 restored material that had been edited out of the original version, making the work nearly a third longer.

Originally posted here:
Anne Frank captured – Aug 04, 1944 – HISTORY.com

Written on August 5th, 2015 & filed under Anne Frank Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1947 first edition cover

Publication date

Publishedin English

The Diary of a Young Girl (also known as The Diary of Anne Frank) is a book of the writings from the Dutch language diary kept by Anne Frank while she was in hiding for two years with her family during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. The family was apprehended in 1944, and Anne Frank died of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The diary was retrieved by Miep Gies, who gave it to Anne’s father, Otto Frank, the family’s only known survivor. The diary has since been published in more than 60 different languages.

First published under the title Het Achterhuis. Dagboekbrieven 14 Juni 1942 1 Augustus 1944 (The Annex: Diary Notes 14 June 1942 1 August 1944) by Contact Publishing in Amsterdam in 1947, the diary received widespread critical and popular attention on the appearance of its English language translation Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl by Doubleday & Company (United States) and Valentine Mitchell (United Kingdom) in 1952. Its popularity inspired the 1955 play The Diary of Anne Frank by the screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, which they adapted for the screen for the 1959 movie version. The book is included in several lists of the top books of the 20th century.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

During the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, Anne Frank received a blank diary as one of her presents on June 12, 1942, her 13th birthday.[7][8] According to The Anne Frank House, the red, checkered autograph book which Anne used as her diary was actually not a surprise, since she had chosen it the day before with her father when perusing a bookstore near her home.[8] She began to write in it on June 14, 1942, two days later.[9][10] On July 5, 1942, Annes older sister Margot received an official summons to report to a Nazi work camp in Germany, and on July 6, Margot and Anne went into hiding with their father Otto and mother Edith. They were joined by Hermann van Pels, Otto’s business partner, including his wife Auguste and their teenage son Peter.[11] Their hiding place was in the sealed-off upper rooms of the annex at the back of Otto’s company building in Amsterdam.[11][12] The rooms were concealed behind a movable bookcase. Mrs. van Pels’ dentist, Fritz Pfeffer, joined them four months later. In the published version, names were changed: the van Pels are known as the Van Daans and Fritz Pfeffer as Mr. Dussel. With the assistance of a group of Otto Frank’s trusted colleagues, they remained hidden for two years and one month.

They were betrayed in August 1944, which resulted in their deportation to Nazi concentration camps. Of the eight people, only Otto Frank survived the war. Anne died when she was 15 years old in Bergen-Belsen, from typhus. The exact date of her death is unknown and has long been believed to be in early March, a few weeks before the prisoners were liberated by British troops in April 1945. However, new research in 2015 indicated that Anne may have died as early as February.[13]

In manuscript, her original diaries are written over three extant volumes. The first volume (the red-and-white checkered autograph book) covers the period between June 14 and December 5, 1942. Since the second surviving volume (a school exercise book) begins on December 22, 1943, and ends on April 17, 1944, it is assumed that the original volume or volumes between December 1942 and December 1943 were lostpresumably after the arrest, when the hiding place was emptied on Nazi instructions. However, this missing period is covered in the version Anne rewrote for preservation. The third existing volume (which was also a school exercise book) contains entries from April 17 to August 1, 1944, when Anne wrote for the last time before her arrest.[14]:2

The manuscript, written on loose sheets of paper, was found strewn on the floor of the hiding place by Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl after the family’s arrest,[15] but before their rooms were ransacked by the Dutch police and the Gestapo. They were kept safe and given after the war to Otto Frank, with the original notes, when Anne’s death was confirmed in the autumn of 1945.[citation needed]

The diary is not written in the classic forms of “Dear Diary” or as letters to oneself; Anne calls her diary “Kitty”, so almost all of the letters are written to Kitty. Anne used the above-mentioned names for her annex-mates in the first volume, from September 25, 1942 until November 13, 1942, when the first notebook ends.[16] It is believed that these names were taken from characters found in a series of popular Dutch books written by Cissy van Marxveldt.[16]

View post:
The Diary of a Young Girl – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Home My Life Book a Speech Links Forum Follow Me on Twitter Archives July 6, 2015, 5:39 PM ‘ADIOS, AMERICA!’ – THE AUDIOBOOK!, HARDCOVER AND KINDLE – TRUMP OPPONENTS TAKE NUANCED VIEW OF CHILD RAPE

July 22, 2015

So it’s worth examining the cultures we’re introducing to America for the purpose of giving the Democrats votes and businesses cheap labor:

— Seventy-seven percent of reported sexual assaults in Lima, Peru, are against child victims, according to the Latin American and Caribbean Youth Network for Sexual and Reproductive Rights (REDLAC).

— A U.N. Special Rapporteur concluded that the only explanation for “the high degree of impunity for violence against women” in Guatemala was that “at least some of the violence was committed by the authorities.”

— CNN reports that 318 10-year-old girls gave birth in Mexico in 2011.

In all of Western Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand combined, there have been eight reported births to girls aged 10 or younger. Seven of the eight involved Third World immigrants.

— The REDLAC report said that girls between the ages of 10 and 15 accounted for more than 15 percent of all births in Argentina and 17 percent of all births in Uruguay.

By contrast, less than 2 percent of births in the U.S. are to girls in that age group — and most of those are Hispanics, who are seven times more likely to give birth between the ages of 10 and 14 than whites, according to a Centers for Disease Control study.

All peasant cultures exhibit extremely non-progressive views on women and children. Mexico just happens to have the peasant culture that lives within walking distance of the United States.

The rest is here:
Ann Coulter – Official Home Page