Game changer: Israeli officials believe the Golan Heights discovery could supply the Jewish State’s oil needs for centuries. (File photo)

HAIFA, Israel After Israel complained for years that it was surrounded by oil-rich states but didnt have a drop within its own borders, it appears theres a big-time turnaround with the announcement Wednesday that massive oil reserves have been located in the Golan Heights,close to the countrys border with Syria.

Afek Oil and Gas, an Israeli subsidiary of the U.S. company Genie Energy, confirmed the find in an interview with Israels Channel 2 TVbut conceded that until the oil is actually extracted, they wont be sure of the actual amounts and quality of the oil that has been discovered.

We are talking about a strata which is 350 meters thick and what is important is the thickness and the porosity, the companys chief geologist, Yuval Bartov, explained. On average in the world, strata are 20-30 meters thick, so this is ten times as large as that, so we are talking about significant quantities. The important thing is to know the oil is in the rock and that’s what we now know.

There is enormous excitement, Bartov said. It’s a fantastic feeling. We came here thinking maybe yes or maybe no, and now things are really happening.

According to a September 2014 Times of Israel report on the Golan exploration, Genie Energy is chaired by Howard Jonas and counts among its more notable investors the former US Vice President Dick Cheney, Michael Steinhardt, Jacob Rothschild, and Rupert Murdoch.

Experts say actually extracting meaningful quantities of oil from the deposits is likely some time away. Some have suggested that while the find could be very significant, the announcement might have as much to do with the share price of the exploration company as the actual certainty that oil will be produced at the site.

The other key consideration in the development of the potential oil feed is its close proximity to the vicious fighting taking place just over the border in neighboring Syria, where ISIS and other jihadi organizations had been battling the Syrian forces of President Assad and his Iran-backed allies Lebanon-based Hezbollah even before Russia recent entry into the regional conflict.

Most recent rocket strikes into Israels Golan territory have generally been declared stray fire by the Israel Defense Forces, but regional experts point out that the potential costs and challenges of protecting future oil fields so close to the war zone, as well as the large target it would provide for enemy fire, could prove challenging should the project indeed come to fruition and provide the Jewish state where a reported 270,000 barrels of oil are consumed daily – with its own source of black gold.

A license to drill in the area was initially issued in April 2013 within an area of nearly 98,000 acres -approximately a third of the Golan itself – but a series of appeals to the Israeli courts by organizations such as the Society for Protection of Nature in Israel and Greenpeace, put all development of the site on hold until a December 2014 ruling gave the green light for drilling.

The main site is close to the small town of Katzrin, which lies northeast of the northern shore of the fabled Sea of Galilee and is home to a wide range of special plants and wild animals, including major nature reserves such as Gamla, home to Israels largest population of Griffon vultures.

The rugged land, captured from Syria during the 1967 Six Day War and still under dispute between the two countries, includes vital underground water sources that feed directly into the Sea of Galilee itself, Israels main source of fresh water.

In recent years massive natural gas reserves have been discovered and developed off the Mediterranean coast of Israel, but political wrangling over who gets which piece of the financial pie has caused a delay in benefits from the find.

The long-running saga has proved a major embarrassment to the government of Benjamin Netanyahu, which in August received a further blow to what the Israeli government had anticipated would be its regional dominance in oil in the eastern Mediterranean when Egypt announced than an Italian company had discovered a gas field estimated at 30 trillion cubic feet. However, the Egyptian fields have yet be developed.

Paul Alster is an Israel-based journalist. Follow him on Twitter @paul_alster and visit his website:

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Potentially game-changing oil reserves discovered in Israel

Written on October 8th, 2015 & filed under Israel Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Jewish state comes to an end in 70 AD, when the Romans begin to actively drive Jews from the home they had lived in for over a millennium. But the Jewish Diaspora (“diaspora” =”dispersion, scattering”) had begun long before the Romans had even dreamed of Judaea. When the Assyrians conquered Israel in 722, the Hebrew inhabitants were scattered all over the Middle East; these early victims of the dispersion disappeared utterly from the pages of history. However, when Nebuchadnezzar deported the Judaeans in 597 and 586 BC, he allowed them to remain in a unified community in Babylon. Another group of Judaeans fled to Egypt, where they settled in the Nile delta. So from 597 onwards, there were three distinct groups of Hebrews: a group in Babylon and other parts of the Middle East, a group in Judaea, and another group in Egypt. Thus, 597 is considered the beginning date of the Jewish Diaspora. While Cyrus the Persian allowed the Judaeans to return to their homeland in 538 BC, most chose to remain in Babylon. A large number of Jews in Egypt became mercenaries in Upper Egypt on an island called the Elephantine. All of these Jews retained their religion, identity, and social customs; both under the Persians and the Greeks, they were allowed to run their lives under their own laws. Some converted to other religions; still others combined the Yahweh cult with local cults; but the majority clung to the Hebraic religion and its new-found core document, the Torah.

In 63 BC, Judaea became a protectorate of Rome. Coming under the administration of a governor, Judaea was allowed a king; the governor’s business was to regulate trade and maximize tax revenue. While the Jews despised the Greeks, the Romans were a nightmare. Governorships were bought at high prices; the governors would attempt to squeeze as much revenue as possible from their regions and pocket as much as they could. Even with a Jewish king, the Judaeans revolted in 70 AD, a desperate revolt that ended tragically. In 73 AD, the last of the revolutionaries were holed up in a mountain fort called Masada; the Romans had besieged the fort for two years, and the 1,000 men, women, and children inside were beginning to starve. In desperation, the Jewish revolutionaries killed themselves rather than surrender to the Romans. The Romans then destroyed Jerusalem, annexed Judaea as a Roman province, and systematically drove the Jews from Palestine. After 73 AD, Hebrew history would only be the history of the Diaspora as the Jews and their world view spread over Africa, Asia, and Europe.

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The Diaspora | Jewish Virtual Library

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Anne Frank the Writer: An Unfinished Story is a joint exhibition of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and The Netherlands Institute For War Documentation, in association with the Anne Frank-Fonds and with support from The Anne Frank House.

It was made possible through the generous support of Eric and Lore Ross and Arthur and Toni Rock, with additional support from the Gonda Family Foundation and the Nathanson Family Foundation. The Museums exhibitions are also supported by the Lester Robbins and Sheila Johnson Robbins Traveling and Special Exhibition Fund, established in 1990.

Museum Statement on the passing of Miep Gies

Buddy Elias, Anne’s closest living relative, describes Anne’s personality and Otto Frank’s dedication to her writings.

Use the zoom tool to get a close-up view of Anne’s writings.

Sara J. Bloomfield, exhibition co-curator and director of the Museum, and Klaus Mller, co-curator, describe the exhibition and the importance of Anne’s story.

Resources related to Anne Frank.

Do you remember the first time you read the Diary of Anne Frank? Do you have questions or comments?

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Anne Frank the Writer | An Unfinished Story

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Tomorrow, the Palestinian flag will be raised for the first time at the United Nations headquarters in New York and at other U.N. offices around the world. The sense of pride among the Palestinian people was overwhelming the day the world voted in favor of this landmark initiative. I am certain that the day our flag rises among the flags of the community of nations will also be a most emotional and proud day.

The General Assembly’s vote confirmed again that we, the people of Palestine, are not alone in our quest for freedom, fulfillment of our rights and an end to decades of Israeli occupation and oppression. On September 30, we will raise our flag in a peaceful gesture that will remind all that justice and independence is ultimately possible. To get to this destination, we need the support of our friends around the world and the leadership of the U.N.

As the U.N. this year marks its 70th anniversary, its longest-standing, unresolved issue is the question of Palestine. For more than 68 years, my people have been denied their rights and denied freedom. In 1948, we were cast out of our places of birth and those of our ancestors; our homes and heritage were destroyed; we were expelled or fled into exile to what were to be temporary camps until the conflict and question of Palestinian statehood were resolved.

Today, Palestinians remain in exile, with over five million refugees denied their right to return. An illegal, oppressive Israeli occupation denies basic human rights, including the right of people to self-determination and freedom — a foundational principle of the U.N. But the Palestinian people have not given up hope and have not given up their rightful and just quest to live in independence and peace in our homeland.

Hope is the power that helps my people endure and overcome the horrors we have too often faced. Many have compared living in Palestine to apartheid. But our situation is even more dire because Israel, the occupying power, is not only executing a system of segregation and subjugation; it persists with the blatant ethnic cleansing of the Palestinian people from their land. While the Israeli government pays lip service to the two-state solution internationally, domestically it employs policies aimed at destroying what’s left of Palestine. Israel demolishes our homes, swallows up our land and works at breaking the spirit and will of our people.

In Bethlehem, Israeli checkpoints and an illegal annexation wall cages in people, depriving them of their rights, livelihoods and access to their land. Palestinians in the Gaza Strip continue to suffer the wounds of last year’s barbaric war as Israel’s cruel blockade imprisons the entire population and renders the Strip uninhabitable. In Occupied East Jerusalem, Israeli forces and leaders aid extremist attacks and religious zealots’ attempts to assert control over Al Aqsa Mosque and ignite a religious conflict. Palestine refugees across the region are suffering repeated displacement, dispossession and trauma, denied the ability to return home.

Countless events every single day illustrate the ways in which Israel’s illegal occupation devastates Palestine. But few recent events resonated with the world, like the arson attack on the Dawabsheh family home. A group of Israeli terrorist settlers smashed the windows of the Dawabsheh home and threw Molotov cocktails inside, immediately burning to death an 18-month-old baby, Ali. Both of Ali’s parents have since perished due to third degree burns. More than a month later, their now-orphaned 4-year-old son remains in the hospital. The Israeli government has attempted to disassociate itself from the attack, but the truth is that its pervasive and systematic colonization of Palestine with settlements, messages of intolerance, flouting of international law and culture of impunity not only facilitated that attack but continue to encourage others like it.

Israel’s pursuit of reckless policies obstructs any international progress for the two-state solution. I recall the high hopes I felt in 1993 when the Oslo Accords were signed and a five-year deadline set to achieve an end to the occupation and peace and security between the two states, the State of Palestine and Israel. That was 22 years ago. Since then, Israel has failed to negotiate in good faith while entrenching its illegal occupation. Israel is not dedicated to the international community’s values of freedom, justice and peace — let alone the two-state solution and the longstanding parameters underpinning it. It has trampled the Oslo Accords and with it the peace process.

As world leaders gather in New York to commemorate the U.N.’s 70th anniversary, these same leaders must also reflect on the U.N.’s failures. Palestine has languished on the U.N. agenda since the organization’s inception. This persistent neglect has cost too many lives, dampened hope, undermined international law and stained the reputation of the U.N. World leaders must find the political will to uphold the rule of law, respect human rights and make good on the commitments they collectively made to the Palestinian people over decades. The U.N. must give my people more than hope.

A peaceful, fair and just solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict exists. But the peace process must be multilateral. The same pattern of negotiations imposed for years will not work because Israel is the occupying power. Israel controls our territory, natural resources, economic affairs and our daily lives, violating every fundamental human right of the Palestinian people. We cannot directly negotiate with a power that has this level of control and exhibits such contempt for the rights and existence of our people.

That is why a collective, multilateral peace process is necessary. Such processes have made significant progress in difficult negotiations for the Balkans, Libya and Iran. They should be attempted to decisively end the Palestinian-Israeli conflict after all these years of futile attempts to achieve peace.

On the vote to raise our flag at the U.N., the international community demonstrated its solidarity with the Palestinian people. Now it must act with urgency to seize the momentum from this symbolic gesture and provide a clear plan to end the illegal Israeli occupation, uphold human rights and achieve justice. It is time to finally achieve the independence of the State of Palestine, peacefully resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict — the core of the Arab-Israeli conflict — as was promised long ago.


Palestinian children play in the rubble of houses in the village of Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

Palestinians enjoy a summer day on the beach of Gaza City on June 16, 2015.

A Palestinian woman walks amid the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on June 1, 2015.

Mohammed al-Selek shows the site where he was injured in an Israeli mortar strike in Gaza City, Gaza.

A Palestinian child sits in front of the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on June 15, 2015.

A Palestinian man dressed as a clown rests in front of destroyed houses in Gaza City, Gaza, on July 8, 2015.

A Palestinian girl stands on the side while her father paints the door of his house in the old Gaza City on June 21, 2015 photo.

A Palestinian boy rides his bike next to his family’s temporary housing in Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

Palestinian children play at the rubble of buildings.

Palestinian trucks unload near the Rafah crossing in the southern Gaza Strip on June 23, 2015.

A Palestinian girl displays her hair in Gaza City, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

A Palestinian boy plays in the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

Palestinian boys sit atop the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

Palestinian women protest against the 50-day war amidst the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

Palestinian boys play by their temporary housing in Khuzaa, Gaza, on July 7, 2015.

A Palestinian boy rides his bicycle amidst the rubble in Khuzaa, Gaza, on June 15, 2015.

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The First-Ever Raising of Palestine’s Flag at the U.N. Is …

Written on October 5th, 2015 & filed under Palestine Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Life Palestine does not perform too well on the Human Development Index where it comes in as no. 110 of the 182 states that are ranked in the world; yet in the MENA region comes in ahead of countries like Egypt and Morocco. On a scale with 1.000 as maximum, Palestine gains 0.737 points. Palestine has no currency of its own, Israeli New Shekels and Jordanian dinars are used. Palestine’s economy is weak from decades of occupation and limitation on personal freedom, as well as poor administration and corruption. Foreign aid contributes greatly to the economy. With a GDP per capita at US$2,900 (2008 estimate), Palestine is 72% below world average. Unemployment is as high as 25%, and 57% of the population are below the poverty line. Economy Despite being low on the MENA ranking, health in Palestine also has a few positive sides, like a moderate child mortality and fairly good doctor density. Health Many sectors of Palestine’s educational system are well-developed, which is mirrored in very high literacy rates. Academic training is in total good at all levels, but of varying quality between institutions. Education Palestinians are the most homogeneous in the Middle East, especially if one counts the few hundred thousand Jews as Israelis. Peoples Just like withe peoples, the situation for languages is largely homogeneous, Arabic being the only language of society. Languages Sunni Islam dominates in Palestine. Christianity is an old religion here, but due to emigration, the number of Christians is falling. Religions Palestinian women have about 4 children, but on the Gaza Strip they have 5. Palestine has one of highest growths in the Middle East. Demographics Are the Palestinians ancestors of the Canaanites, or simply Arab immigrants? Both views are frequently expressed. The lands the Palestinians call home has seen many important historical events through the millenniums. But the history is also a sad one, and perhaps never before have the Palestinians suffered more, being unwanted in Israel and without hope of obtaining citizenship in the Arab neighbouring states. History

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Palestine – LookLex Encyclopaedia

An Israeli soldier speaks on his mobile phone at a military outpost at Mount Hermon in the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights overlooking the Israel-Syria border on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015.


JERUSALEM – The Israeli military said Sunday it struck two Syrian army posts with artillery fire after rockets from the war-torn country landed in Israeli-controlled territory.

The military said the two rockets, which landed over the last two days, were errant fire from the Syrian conflict. They caused no damage or injuries.

Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, an Israeli military spokesman, said in a statement that Israel holds the Syrian military “responsible and accountable for any aggression emanating from Syria.”

Rami Abdurrahman, the head of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said a Syrian army position in the Quneitra region of the Golan Heights was hit at least four times by the Israeli military. Activists have reported intense fighting between Syrian troops and insurgents in the Quneitra area in recent days.

Israel has mostly stayed on the sidelines throughout the Syrian war. But the military has returned fire when rockets or mortar shells have strayed into Israeli-controlled territory. Israel has also carried out a number of airstrikes against suspected weapons shipments destined for its enemies.

2015 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Israel strikes Syrian army posts in Golan Heights – CBS News

Senior officials say Moscow contacted National Security Adviser Yossi Cohen an hour before the Russian attack.

UNITED NATIONS Russia informed Israel in advance about its intention to carry out an aerial attack in Syria, senior Israeli officials told Haaretz on Wednesday.

The sources said Russian government officials made contact with Yossi Cohen, the national security adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office, as well as with senior figures in the Israeli defense establishment about an hour before the Russian attack, saying that Russian planes would shortly thereafter be bombing targets in Syria.

The Russians’ advance notice was apparently designed to avoid any confrontation between Israeli and Russian planes in the course of the operation.

The information was provided to Israel in accordance with understandings that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Russian President Vladimir Putin reached when they met in Moscow a week ago. The two leadersagreed to establish a mechanism for coordination between the Israel Defense Forces and the Russian army to head off any unintentional encounters in Syrian airspace. In a briefing with reporters in New York after his meeting on Monday with U.S. President Barack Obama, Putin acknowledged that Israel has security interests in Syria, and that he respects this.

Russia said it launched airstrikes against the Islamic State group in Syria on Wednesday after Putin secured his parliament’s unanimous backing to intervene to prop up the Kremlin’s closest Middle East ally.

In addition to the contact with Israel, Moscow gave Washington an hour’s notice of the strikes, which set in motion Russia’s biggest play in the region since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, a U.S. official said. Targets in the Homs area appeared to have been struck, but not areas held by Islamic State, the U.S. official said. The Russian Defense Ministry said, however, that its attacks were directed at Islamic State military targets.

Reuters contributed to this report.

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Russia gave Israel advance notice of its air strikes in …

Written on October 3rd, 2015 & filed under Israel Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Creation, The first day, The second day, Third the day, The Fourth Day, The Fifth Day, The Sixth Day, The Seventh Day

The First Man and Woman, G-ds Blessing, The Garden of Eden, The Serpent, The First Commandment, The Plot, The First Sin, Their Excuse, The Punishment, Expulsion from the Garden of Eden

Cain and Abel, Cains Jealousy, Cains Warned, The Murder of Abel, Cains Punishment, Cains Repentance, Cains Children, Cains Death

Adams Death, Seths Children, Enoch, Methuselah

The Wickedness of the People, The Ark, The Flood, The Flood Recedes, The Raven and the Dove, Noah Offering, The Seven Laws, Covenant with Noah

Hams Sin, Shem and His Descendants

Conceit of the People, Their Punishment, Nimrod

Abrams Family, Abrams Birth, Nimrods Attempt on Abrams Life, Young Abram Recognizes G-d, Abram Destroys the Idols, In Nimrods Hands, The Miracle in the Furnace, G-d Commands and Promise to Abram, Abrams Obedience

Abram Goes To Egypt, The Strife of the Herdsmen, Abram and Lot Separate, Lot a Prisoner of War, The Rescue

Count the Stars, Takes Hagar as Wife, The Covenant, Abrahams Guests

The Wickedness of the Sodomites, Abraham Pleads For Sodom, Lots Hospitality, Lot and His Family Are Saved, The Dead Sea

Abraham in Gerar, Isaacs Birth, Ishmael, The Miraculous Well

G-ds strange Command, Father and Son Together, The Akedah – Alter, Abrahams Reward, Abraham and Isaac Return, Sarahs Death

Eliezers Mission, Eliezers Prayer, Rebekah at the Well, Rebekah and Isaac Marries

Birth of the Twins, Jacob and Esau Grow Up, Abrahams Death, Esau Kills Nimrod, Jacob Buys the Birthright, Isaac Goes To Philistina

Esaus Evil Ways, Rebekahs Ploy, The Blessing, Esau Returns

Rebecca Sends Jacob to Haran, Jacob and Eliphaz, Jacobs Dream, Jacobs Vow, Jacobs Arrival in Haran

The Price of a Wife, Jacobs Children, Jacobs Wealth

Jacob Leaves Laban, Laban Instigates Esau to Make War on His Brother, Jacobs Strategy, Jacob Wrestles with an Angel, Jacobs Reconciliation with Esau, Jacobs Arrival in Canaan, Rachels Death

The Destruction of Shechem, The War against the Seven Kings

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A Brief Biblical History – From Our People: A History of the …

Written on September 28th, 2015 & filed under Jewish History Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A wide variety of geographic definitions of Palestine have been used over the centuries, and those definitions have always been emotionally and politically contentious.

On November 15th, 1988, the Palestinian National Council declared independence from the State of Israel.

Currently the “State of Palestine” is officially recognised by the United Nations as a Non-Member Observer State, a status granted on November 29. 2012. The only other geographic entity currently holding this status is the Holy See (Vatican), while Switzerland held the status until 2002.

As of August 2014, 134 nations have officially recognized Palestine as a sovereign state following the Palestinian declaration of independence. Notably, of the G-20 nations,only Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Turkey recognize the declaration of independence. Of the G-8 nations, only Russia officially defines Palestine as a sovereign state.

Many of the historical issues concerning Israelis and Palestinians involve geography and maps. In recent years the fragmented Palestinian Territories are generally located within the Gaza Strip, East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

Larger Palestine Flag

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Map of Palestine – Palestinian Maps and Information, Gaza …

Palestine (from Latin: Palaestina; Hebrew: Pleshet, Palestina; Arabic: Filastn, Falastn) is a name sometimes given to part of the land that generally comprises the Promised Land given to the Israelites / Jews in the Bible. Though historically Jews did reside there, it is not directly associated with the Jewish promise, as it is a geopolitical designation more than a religious one. Palestine was a later name for the province of Judea in the Roman Empire, who ruled the Jewish people at that time.[1] The Romans also renamed Jerusalem to Aelia Capitolina.

After the Romans renamed Israel as Syria Palestina in 132-135 AD, Palestine is one of many names for the geographic region between the Mediterranean Sea and the River Jordan. Many different definitions of the region have been in usage in the past three thousand years. It was never an Arab state, and much of it’s history has been falsified by the Palestinian movement and its sympathizers in order to to create a new identity to give the Arab nations a new weapon to use to fight against the nation of Israel.

The Hebrew scriptures call the region Canaan when referring to the pre-Israelite period,(Hebrew: ) and afterwards Israel (Yisrael). The name “Land of the Hebrews” (Hebrew: , Eretz Ha-Ivrim) is also found. The wide area appears to be the habitat of the ancient ethnic Hebrews, though perhaps shared with other ethnic groups. The land of Canaan is part of the land given to the descendants of Abraham, which extends from the Nile to the Euphrates River (Genesis 15:18). Already in Genesis 12:6 and 7 we can read: And Abram passed through the land unto the place of Sichem, unto the plain of Moreh. And the Canaanite was then in the land. And the LORD appeared unto Abram, and said, Unto thy seed will I give this land. This land is said to include an area called Aram Naharaim, which includes Haran in modern Turkey.

In the Qur’an, the term (“Holy Land”, Al-Ard Al-Muqaddasah) is mentioned at least seven times, once when Moses proclaims to the Children of Israel: “O my people! Enter the holy land which Allah hath assigned unto you, and turn not back ignominiously, for then will ye be overthrown, to your own ruin.” (Surah 5:21)

Originally inhabited by a loose bonding of Canaanite tribes, the Israelites settled into the area after the Exodus from Egypt and were partially successful in driving out the Canannites and making it their home. Migrations from the ‘Peoples of the Sea’ led to a strong Phillistine presence on the coastline, but they were generally subdued by King David and Solomon during the height of ancient Israel. The kingdom was subsequently divided into the Northern Kingdom and Judea upon the death of Solomon. The Northern Kingdom, and the remnants of the Philistine kingdoms, were conquered by the Assyrians in the late 8th century B.C. and the kingdom of Judea fell under Babylonian control in the late 7th century and lost their independence completely in 586 B.C. with the fall of Jerusalem, their capital. The Jews were allowed to return under the Persian Empire and the entire area was conquered by Alexander the Great around 330 B.C. When his empire broke apart at his death and consolidated into four different regions, it was the Ptolemies centered in Egypt who controlled the region for the better part of the next two centuries, but conquest by the Seleucids led to a harsh religious persecution on the Jews in the region. The Jews revolted and had their independence for almost 100 years before a civil war courted Roman intervention and the area came under Roman control and eventually became the province of Palestine. Byzantine rule was forcefully removed by the great Islamic waves of the 7th century A.D. Portions of Palestine were reclaimed under Crusader control from the late 11th century until the mid 13th century, but the overall region was under Islamic control for over 1000 years. Worth mentioning that the Philistines who at one time lived in part of the area were completely conquered by King David.

In the mid-1200’s, Mamelukes, originally soldier-slaves of the Arabs based in Egypt, established an empire that in time included the area of Palestine. Arab-speaking Muslims made up most of the population of the area once called Palestine. Beginning in the late 1300’s, Jews from Spain and other Mediterranean lands settled in Jerusalem and other parts of the land. The Ottoman Empire defeated the Mamelukes in 1517, and Palestine became part of the Ottoman Empire. The Turkish Sultan invited Jews fleeing the Spanish Catholic inquisition to settle in the Turkish empire, including several cities in Palestine. [2]

The breakup of the Ottoman Empire after their defeat in World War I saw the region come under the control of Great Britain. While there was always a Jewish remnant who never left, Jewish re-emigration to the area increased under the tolerant eyes of the British. This increased after the atrocities of World War II and the areas were given their independence with Palestine being divided into separate Jewish and Arab nations, the Jewish nation being called Israel and the Arab Palestine.

A war broke out in which the Jews expanded their borders and the Arab nation of Palestine was absorbed by Jordan. Hostility between the Arabs and Jews continued and in 1967 Israel conquered the West Bank from Jordan, taking the bulk of the Jewish land that had been the “Palestinian state”. UN resolution 242 called for the Israeli removal from that land, but it did not occur. Attempts to hold Israel accountable were vetoed in the Security Council by the United States. Although the land was part of Jordan, Jordan relinquished its rights in the 1980s telling the Israelis to speak with the Palestinian Arabs directly. The 1967 Israel borders have no popular support among ordinary Palestinian residents. What most people call the 1967 Israel borders is really a cease-fire line (armistice) dating back to 1949; this armistice agreement was never a permanent treaty between Israel and any Arab country. [3]

In 1988, the Kingdom of Jordan renounced all claims to the territory known as Judea and Samaria within Israel, and “The West Bank” to the rest of the world.[4] In 1994 Jordan made that renunciation permanent. It negotiated a permanent treaty of peace with Israel. That treaty set the boundary along the Jordan and Yarmouk Rivers, through the Dead Sea, then southwest along the Emek Haarava (or Wadi Araba in Arabic) line to the Gulf of Aqaba.[5] For that reason, the Judea-Samaria region is not an occupied territory at all, but a territory under military administration, the civilian population of which (with key exceptions) have leaders desiring secession and independence.

Today’s Palestinian Arabs are children and grandchildren of Arab immigrants from the surrounding nations [6][7]

The Palestinian Intifada from the late 1980s tried to regain Arab control of the West Bank region of Israel. While first clamping down harshly, Israel did sign an accord to grant the Palestinian Arabs autonomy in the West Band and the Gaza Strip, but not full independence. The borders of a future Palestinian state has been a stumbling block to a final solution with the Arabs wanting to control all of the area captured in the 1967 War and Israel claiming part of the land for the Jewish people. A continuing series of violent actions on the part of the Palestinian Arabs and an inability to find a comprise has prevented any type of permanent solution. The short term solution is bleak. With Hamas having the majority of the control in the Palestinian legislature, a terrorist entity that does not even recognize Israel’s right to exist in its own land (seeks to ethnic cleanse all Jews in the area and create a radical oppressive Islamic state, its head in Damascus Osama Hamdan supports Ahmadinejad’s genocide call to “wipe off Israel off the map” [8] and Hamas Cleric Muhsen Abu ‘Ita said: “The Annihilation of the Jews in Palestine is One of The Most Splendid Blessings for Palestine”[9].

The Palestinian National Authority (PNA) is an autonomous national entity comprising the territories of Gaza (formerly under Egyptian sovereignty) and West Bank (formerly under Jordan sovereignty), which were occupied by the Israeli Defense Forces in Jun 1967. As provided by the Israeli-PLO Declaration of Principles signed on 13 Sep 1993 and upon the Agreement signed on 4 May 1994, the PNA was inaugurated on 5 Jul 1994 as a transitional status including Palestinian interim self-governing and a phased transfer of powers and territories (towns and areas of the West Bank). Negotiations on the permanent status, which could end in a Palestinian State, are under way. Headquarters: Ramallah, Chairmen of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO): Mahmoud Ridha Abbas[10]

Currently, the Palestinians living in disputed territories are trying to create a state called Palestine. The Palestine Liberation Organization has declared the State of Palestine, which is recognized by 130 United Nations member states, the Arab League, and the United Nations.

Each year, Palestinians throughout the region mark the Nakba (or catastrophe) Day with demonstrations; they use the term “nakba” to describe their defeat and displacement in the war that followed Israel’s founding on May 15, 1948 when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were uprooted. But never before have marchers descended upon Israel’s borders from all directions. The Syrian incursion in May 2011 was especially surprising. The events carried a message for Israel: Even as it wrestles with the Palestinian demand for a state in the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem areas Israel captured in the 1967 Mideast war there is a related problem of neighboring countries that host millions of Palestinians with aspirations to return.

International Protesters in the United Kingdom, led by Dave Randall, released a song in May 2011 as support for the Palestinians.[11] This has brought about huge criticism from Glenn Beck.[12]

Palestine is part of a region of the Middle East known as the Levant and has cultural similarities to other Levantine countries such as Syria,Lebanon and Jordan.The signature dish of the Palestinians is musakhkhan, a chicken dish.[13]

Palestine – Conservapedia

Written on September 28th, 2015 & filed under Palestine Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,